Course Incarc and HIV

Course Incarc and HIV - HIV and INCARCERATION: HIV and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: HIV and INCARCERATION: HIV and INCARCERATION: DUAL EPIDEMICS DUAL EPIDEMICS David Alain Wohl, MD David Alain Wohl, MD Associate Professor - University of North Carolina Associate Professor - University of North Carolina Co-Director for HIV Services NC Dept of Correction Co-Director for HIV Services NC Dept of Correction US imprisonment rate, 1925 - 2002 http://www.census.gov/statab/hist/02HS0024.xls 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Year Rate (per 100,000) Incarceration in the US 1 in every 99 adults in the US is incarcerated The prison population in 2007 was 1.6 million (7% are women) Another 723,000 are in jails Incarceration rates - Men (18y+): 1 in 106 White 1 in 36 Latino 1 in 15 AA 1 in 9 age 20-34y Incarceration rates - Women (35-39y): 1 in 335 White 1 in 297 Latina 1 in 100 AA 1 in 9 state government employees works in corrections States spent $44 billion on corrections in 2007 - 1 of every 15 state general fund dollars spent Imprisonment rate* (per 100,000) 144 - 273 274 - 414 415 - 533 534 - 797 Imprisonment rate, 2005 *Sentences greater than 1 year Adapted from Harrison PM and Beck AJ. Prisoners at mid-year 2005. Bureau of Justice Statistics, May 2006, NCJ 213133 Impact of Incarceration: Community AA men (13%) of US population account for 40% of prison inmates. 12.6% of all AA men 25-29 y are in prison or jail. One-third of AA men between the ages of 20-29 y are under correctional supervision. If current trends continue, 1 of 3 AA males can expect to be incarcerated. Risk of incarceration is substantially greater for AA men than white men, given the same crime. Normalization of incarceration and effect on normative community values of sex, violence and drug use. Prison as a rite of passage or expected event, equivalent to military service or college education. Mauer, M. 2003. The Sentencing Project. Comparative international rates of incarceration . Zierler S, Krieger, N. Annu Rev Public Health 1997;18:401 Impact of Incarceration: Individual The vast majority of persons who are incarcerated are released. Mean duration of sentence is 2 years (US BJS). Incarceration impacts: Employment prospects Benefit eligibility Disrupted social/family networks Brutalizing experience HIV transmission within prison Dual Epidemics Rethinking the Role of Incarceration in the HIV Epidemic Rethinking the Role of Incarceration in the HIV Epidemic HIV in Correctional Settings HIV and incarceration target the same communities leading to the concentration of HIV within correctional facilities. Disproportionately, persons at risk for HIV including illicit drug users and sex workers are arrested, convicted and incarcerated. Most have had limited access to quality health care....
View Full Document

Page1 / 57

Course Incarc and HIV - HIV and INCARCERATION: HIV and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online