April 9 - April 9, 2009 Life, Leisure, and Culture -Penny...

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April 9, 2009 Life, Leisure, and Culture -Penny Press -Minstrel Shows - Barnum and Tom Thumb -Transcendentalism -Emerson -Margaret Fuller -Brooke Farm -Thoreau -Art and Popular Culture -Landscapes—Cole -Audubon -Daguerreotypes -Edgar Allen Poe -Walt Whitman The penny press—newspapers of the day. Before 1830, 4 paged newspaper front and back, and they were filled with political information. Sponsored by political parties, but around 1830 there are changes in technology to change the way in which the people read news, the format, and who would read. They were printed on daily, not weekly, began to rely on circulation, individual people, and ads make their appearance. One of the first was called the Penny Press, sold for a penny 1833, the New York sun. 1835, three penny presses, relied on people now, relied on ads, and this revolutionizes what is in the papers. Begin to see investigative journalism. People want to read about political and econ, but interested in topics of murders.
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Helen Jewett murder of a prostitute, 1836. Penny Press revolutionized news reporting. Type of thing people want to read about, murders, crime, there is a dramatic shift of the coverage. Mass people see minstrel shows, 1830, in northern cities and they included both white men in black face. Troups of African American men, were travel shows, were dances, songs, humorous skits. Broadway becoming a big thing. They are for working class men who move into middle class. Songs are written by white people depicting African Americans. Stephen Foster, becomes one of the first professional song writers. “Old Folks at Home” 1851. Writes Florida state song. Wrote many minstrel songs. These minstrel shows depicted images of African Americans and encouraged and re- enforced stereotypes (stupid, spontaneous sings and dance, exoticness, clumsy) Abolitionist sentiment is still on the rise at the same time, these stereotypes only re- enforce and they do so through stock characters “Zip Coon” arrogant, uppity, doesn’t know his place. “Uncle Ned” docile, humble, faithful slave. “Jim Crow” was a character introduced in 1832 through a song written and sung by “daddy” Dan rice in his minstrel act. He knew his place By 1850, new York from san Francisco had its own theater for minstrel show. Tyler to Pierce had minstrel shows. Rise again in late 1800’s but it was almost exclusively men in black face. Phineas T. Barnum—the most famous entrepreneur of the 19 th century. Born in Connecticut, became a shop keeper, but in 1829 he decides to get into the newspaper business. But, he has several liable suits and he spends some time in prison. In 1834 moves to new York city and he began his career as a showman. In 1835 he introduces
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Joice Heth to the world. Was blind and nearly paralyzed, and he purchases this
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April 9 - April 9, 2009 Life, Leisure, and Culture -Penny...

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