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171 EXTENSIVE READING: THEORY, RESEARCH AND IMPLEMENTATION Qiu Rong Ng ([email protected]) Willy A Renandya (willy.renandya[email protected]) Miao Yee Clare Chong ([email protected])National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University 50 Nanyang Ave, Singapore 639798 Abstract:There are three purposes of this paper, the first of which is to elucidate the theory and principles underlying extensive reading. Long-held principles will be discussed in light of practical classroom and contextual considerations. Secondly, a critical summary of current research on extensive reading that has been conducted in English as a Second Language and English as a Foreign Language contexts and has been published over the last five years will be presented. By highlighting the vast benefits of extensive reading on improving many aspects of L2 learners’ language proficiency, we hope to encourage greater implementation of extensive reading in educational institutions worldwide. Teachers will also become more familiar with future directions in the practice of implementing extensive reading programs such as how to capitalize on the potential of the Internet to monitor and assess learners’ progress in reading extensively. Thirdly, the paper provides directions for future research which we believe might fill critical gaps in our knowledge about ER. Keywords: extensive reading, L2 proficiency, comprehension hypothesis DOI:There are many different terms for extensive reading (ER), including pleasure reading, self-selected reading, free voluntary reading, and wide reading. Over
172TEFLIN Journal, Volume 30, Number 2, July 2019 the years, a plethora of studies has revealed that ER enables students to reap numerous linguistic benefits, including improved reading fluency (Huffman, 2014; McLean & Rouault, 2017, Nakanishi, 2015), vocabulary acquisition (Suk, 2016; Webb & Chang, 2015), and better writing skills (Mermelstein, 2015; Park, 2016). Besides linguistic benefits, students also develop wider and deeper knowledge about the world, which is essential in relating and connecting with the text and other people (Renandya, 2016). According to Day and Bamford (1998), ER provides students with a lot of easily comprehensible English books of various genres, allowing them to enjoy the learning process while improving their reading proficiency at the same time. In 2002, Day and Bamford (pp. 137-141) developed 10 principles of ER which could be regarded as the key ingredients of a successful ER program and encouraged teachers to use them. The 10 principles were: 1.The reading material is easy 2.A variety of reading material on a wide range of topics is available. 3.Learners choose what they want to read. 4.Learners read as much as possible. 5.Reading is for pleasure, and to gain information and general understanding.

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Term
Summer
Professor
SherryKamradt
Tags
Effect size, Language proficiency

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