Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson - Wilson, Woodrow W Woodrow Wilson, 28th...

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Wilson, Woodrow W Woodrow Wilson, 28th president of the United States (1913-21), secured a W legislative program of progressive domestic reform, guided his country l during WORLD WAR I, and sought a peace settlement based on high moral d principles, to be guaranteed by the LEAGUE OF NATIONS. p Early Life and Career E Thomas Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Va., on Dec. 28, 1856. He was T profoundly influenced by a devoutly religious household headed by his p father, Joseph Ruggles Wilson, a Presbyterian minister, and his mother, f Janet Woodrow Wilson, the daughter of a minister. Woodrow (he dropped the
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J Thomas in 1879) attended (1873-74) Davidson College and in 1875 entered the T College of New Jersey (later Princeton University), graduating in 1879. C Wilson studied (1879-80) at the University of Virginia Law School, briefly W practiced law in Atlanta, and in 1883 entered The Johns Hopkins University p for graduate study in political science. His widely acclaimed book, f Congressional Government (1885), was published a year before he received C the doctoral degree. In 1885 he married Ellen Louise Axson; they had three t daughters. d Wilson taught at Bryn Mawr College (1885-88) and Wesleyan University W in Connecticut (1888-90) before he was called (1890) to Princeton as i professor of jurisprudence and political economy. A popular lecturer, p Wilson also wrote a score of articles and nine books, including Division W and Reunion (1893) and his five-volume History of the American People a
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(1902). In 1902 he was the unanimous choice of the trustees to become ( Princeton's president. His reforms included reorganization of the P departmental structure, revision of the curriculum, raising of academic d standards, tightening of student discipline, and the still-famous s preceptorial system of instruction. But Wilson's quad plan--an attempt to p create colleges or quadrangles where students and faculty members would c live and study together--was defeated. Opposed by wealthy alumni and l trustees, he also lost his battle for control of the proposed graduate t college. c The Princeton controversies, seen nationally as a battle between T democracy and vested wealth, propelled Wilson into the political arena. d George Harvey, editor of Harper's Weekly, with help from New Jersey's G Democratic party bosses, persuaded Wilson to run for governor in 1910. D After scoring an easy victory, he cast off his machine sponsors and A
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A launched a remarkable program of progressive legislation, including a l direct-primary law, antitrust laws, a corrupt-practices act, a workmen's d compensation act, and measures establishing a public utility commission and c permitting cities to adopt the commission form of government. p Success in New Jersey made him a contender for the Democratic S presidential nomination. Although Wilson entered the 1912 Democratic p National Convention a poor second to Speaker of the House Champ Clark, his N strength increased as Clark's faded, and he won the nomination after 46
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course EDS 103 taught by Professor White during the Spring '10 term at E. Kentucky.

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Woodrow Wilson - Wilson, Woodrow W Woodrow Wilson, 28th...

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