Catcher in the Ry1

Catcher in the Ry1 - Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salingers...

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Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, should long be remembered as an American classic. Although some may not consider it one of the most eloquently written stories of its time, it certainly captures the reader’s attention. Salinger is able to incorporate philosophical views throughout the story in terms of Holden’s ethical code; at the same time, he keeps the reader entranced with radical turns of events and Holden’s character. As far as ethics is concerned, Holden has his fair share of bad moral judgments. He demonstrates a very negative principle when he decides, “. .. I’d get the hell out of Pency-right that same night and all. I mean not wait till Wednesday or anything. I just didn’t want to hang around any more” (51). In this simple action, Holden gives himself away as a man of little reasoning. He shows that he has no desire to have his life run by authority, so he packs up his belongings and leaves at will. A second show of disagreeable morals is presented in the form of Holden’s drinking habit, “I ordered a Scotch and soda, which is my favorite drink, next to frozen Daiquiris” (85). Drinking in itself does not constitute moral corruption, yet drinking at Holden’s young
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Catcher in the Ry1 - Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salingers...

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