Everything That Rises Must Converge

Everything That Rises Must Converge - Everything That Rises...

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Everything That Rises Must Converge There is an absolute theme of integration in "Everything That Rises Must Converge" by Flannery O’ Connor. Through the experience of reading this short story, we can depict the characters’ past experiences. There are two incompatible personalities in the passage, Mrs. Chestney, the mother, which represents the transition from the old South, and Julian, the son, who represents the transition of the new South. Due to the fact that Mrs. Chestney was the granddaughter of a governor, it purely conveys that she ranked high in wealth and position. This purely expresses her growing experience in a southern manner and to behave in a gentile southern manner. In relation to integration, Mrs. Chestney dismisses the plight of blacks with a southern response, "They should rise, yes, but on their own side of their fence". This attitude most likely resulted from being taught to talk this way all her life. Although she makes thoughtless remarks, her genuine affection for her childhood nurse Caroline,
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course EDS 103 taught by Professor White during the Spring '10 term at E. Kentucky.

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Everything That Rises Must Converge - Everything That Rises...

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