Hamlet - 574 In the first section of the passage, Hamlet is...

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574 In the first section of the passage, Hamlet is filled with self-loathing. His feelings of worthlessness are made quite apparent as he questions himself with statements like “What is a man, if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? A beast no more.” This metaphor clearly shows how unworthy Hamlet feels about the fact that he has been lying around doing nothing and his father remains unavenged. His use of unpleasant imagery like “bestial oblivion” and “fust” also contribute to his tone. Hamlet knows he has been thinking too much and acting too little. He questions his own courage when he says that his thoughts are “ but one part wisdom and ever three parts coward.” Hamlet understands that pondering on an action like he has been doing only leads to excuses to ignore the offense done to him, and it is his fear creating the excuses and leaving his honor soiled. In the second section of the passage Hamlet is still angry at himself, especially when he views himself next to Fortinbras. He juxtaposes his own
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course EDS 103 taught by Professor White during the Spring '10 term at E. Kentucky.

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