Huckleberry Fin1

Huckleberry Fin1 - Huckleberry Finn - Racist Novel? There...

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Huckleberry Finn - Racist Novel? There is a major argument among literary critics whether The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is or is not a racist novel. The question focuses on the depiction of Jim, the black slave, and the way he is treated by Huck and other characters. The use of the word "nigger" is also a point raised by some critics, who feel that Twain uses the word too often and too loosely. Mark Twain never presents Jim in a negative light. He does not show Jim as a drunkard, as a mean person, or as a cheat. This is in contrast to the way Huck's (white) father is depicted, whom Twain describes using all of the above characterizations and more. The reader views Jim as a good friend - a man devoted to his family and loyal to his companions. Jim is, however, very naive and superstitious. Some critics say that Twain is implying that all blacks have these qualities. When Jim turns to his magic hairball for answers about the future, we see that he does believe in some foolish things. But all the same, he is visited by both blacks and whites to use the hairball's powers. This type of naivete was abundant at the time and found amongst all races - the result of a lack of proper education. So, the depiction of Jim is not negative in the sense that Jim is stupid and inferior, and this aspect of
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course EDS 103 taught by Professor White during the Spring '10 term at E. Kentucky.

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Huckleberry Fin1 - Huckleberry Finn - Racist Novel? There...

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