Songs of Innocence and Experience

Songs of Innocence and Experience - Songs of Innocence and...

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Songs of Innocence and Experience In William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience, the gentle lamb and the dire tiger define childhood by setting a contrast between the innocence of youth and the experience of age. The Lamb is written with childish repetitions and a selection of words which could satisfy any audience under the age of five. Blake applies the lamb in representation of youthful immaculateness. The Tyger is hard-featured in comparison to The Lamb, in respect to word choice and representation. The Tyger is a poem in which the author makes many inquiries, almost chantlike in their reiterations. The question at hand: could the same creator have made both the tiger and the lamb? For William Blake, the answer is a frightening one. The Romantic Period’s affinity towards childhood is epitomized in the poetry of Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience. "Little Lamb who made thee/ Dost thou know who made thee (Blake 1-2)." The Lamb’s introductory lines set the style for what follows: an innocent poem about
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Songs of Innocence and Experience - Songs of Innocence and...

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