The Downfall of Macbeth

The Downfall of Macbeth - The Downfall of Macbeth Macbeth's...

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The Downfall of Macbeth Macbeth's love for Lady Macbeth, in William Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, caused Macbeth to feel the need to prove his manhood, which eventually lead to his downfall. Macbeth was not secure in his manhood, so he felt the need to prove himself to Lady Macbeth. After he proved he was a man by killing Duncan, and he felt he had a lot of power to do whatever he wanted. Macbeth became desensitized between all the killing and the hype of being the King. In the beginning of the play Macbeth showed his love for Lady Macbeth in many different ways. He told her his feelings toward her "My dearest love" (act I, scene v, l 58). Macbeth listens to what Lady Macbeth has to say, and takes her advice into consideration every time he makes a decision. He also has great love for her and tries his best to make her happy no matter what it takes. Then Lady Macbeth convinced Macbeth that he wasn't a man unless he went through with the murder of Duncan. She threatens his manhood by saying "When you durst do it, then you were a
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