The Lottery

The Lottery - 703 Shirley Jacksons insights and...

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703 Shirley Jackson’s insights and observations about man and society are reflected in her famous short story "The Lottery". Many of her readers have found this story shocking and disturbing. Jackson reveals two general attitudes in this story: first, the shocking reality of human’s tendency to select a scapegoat and second, society as a victim of tradition and ritual. Throughout history we have witnessed and participated in many events, where, in time of turmoil and hardship, society has a tendency to seize upon a scapegoat as means of resolution. The people of the village had been taught to believe that in order for their crop to be abundant for the year, some individual had to be sacrificed. "Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon", said Old Man Warner. The irony here is that villagers are aware that this act is inhumane but none want to stand and voice their opinion, for fear of going against society’s standards and being outcast or being stoned. "It’s not the way it used to be," Old Man Warner said clearly. "People ain’t the way they used to be." Fear that if they go against society they might be chosen as the lottery winner
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The Lottery - 703 Shirley Jacksons insights and...

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