The Social Structure of Canterbury Tales

The Social Structure of Canterbury Tales - The Social...

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The Social Structure of Canterbury Tales In the famous works, “Canterbury Tales,” Geoffrey Chaucer tells of twenty-nine pilgrims that are “en route” to Canterbury. On the way there, the band of pilgrims entertain each other with a series of tall tales in order to shorten the trip. Chaucer, (the host) introduces the each of the pilgrims with honest and wholeheartedly descriptions introduce them with their own personality. Throughout the prologue, he finds an unusual uniqueness in their common lives and traits. Chaucer's characters represent an extremely broad cross-section of all parts of society, except for the nobility. His stories represented the people themselves and touched on all of the social classes that existed. Chaucer treats all of the subjects as love, humor and death in poetry. In the romantic story of "The Knight's Tale,” one can notice that the Knight fits loosely into the aristocrats, also known as the upper class. In the story, the Knight’s character reflects on the conclusion, with courage, skill in battle, respect for
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The Social Structure of Canterbury Tales - The Social...

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