ch3mythdevelopment

Ch3mythdevelopment - Classics 10 Chapter 3 Spring 2010 The Development of Classical Myth[Cultural Attitudes I The Archaic Period II The Classical

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Classics 10: Chapter 3: Spring 2010 The Development of Classical Myth [Cultural Attitudes] I. The Archaic Period II. The Classical Period III. The Hellenistic / Roman Period IV. The Influence of the Near East QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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The Aegean Greek World Greek cities like frogs around a pond Pond = Aegean Sea Mainland Greece, Thrace, Asia Minor, Crete, and all the islands in between Greek culture exists on the sea as much as on the mainland
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Greek Cultural Attitudes Myths were universally popular, as far as we can tell, but it is hard to recover the lives and attitudes of the average Greek Our evidence mostly involves Athens, and primarily the elite males of Athens Most myths involves heroes and elite figures (or gods!), and elite cultural attitudes surely affected the way they passed down the stories So it’s good to know a little about those attitudes
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Greek Society: Males “Greek” usually means “Athenian” Freedom defined Greeks as citizens of their city as opposed to “barbarians” Education: reading, writing, athletics, all to be a good voter and fighter for your city Males became citizens at age 18 (two year initiation period as an “ephebe” [youth]) Self-control (“sophrosyne”) = most valued virtue (“Know thyself. Nothing in excess.”) War = the defining activity of manhood Justice = “Help your friends, harm your enemies”
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Homosocial Society Men spent most of their time with men; women were hidden and uneducated Agonistic ([Gk.] agon = contest) culture Hoplites and the Phalanx Hoplites = armed infantrymen, with shield and spear Hand-to-hand fighting in a tightly organized line; the men on either side depended on you and vice versa Unity for survival; failure was a source of shame Lots of drinking and sex Symposium = “drinking party”; basic social context; heavy drinking and sex common Greek sex seen to manifest positions of status
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“The Penetration Paradigm” Person doing the thrusting is to have higher social status; person being thrusted into has lower status. -- gender less important than role of thrusting Pederasty = gay love between youth and boy -- Boy learns ways of manhood; youth gets sex (thighs, anal) -- “romantic love” for high society Greeks
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Greek Society: Females We have largely skewed sources (i.e., men) about their attitudes and values Much Greek literature is misogynistic Ideal woman: tall, beautiful, submissive, fertile, chaste, out of sight Women lived in their own part of the house: the gynaikeion Rarely outside of the home (except for religious
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This note was uploaded on 01/10/2011 for the course CLA CLA 10 taught by Professor Stem during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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Ch3mythdevelopment - Classics 10 Chapter 3 Spring 2010 The Development of Classical Myth[Cultural Attitudes I The Archaic Period II The Classical

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