ch4creation

ch4creation - Classics 10 Chapter 4 Spring 2010 Myths of...

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Classics 10: Chapter 4: Spring 2010 Myths of Creation: The Rise of Zeus [Development of Greek Myth] I. Legacy of the Near East II. Hesiod’s Theogony : The First Generations of Gods A. Chaos to Gaea and Uranus B. Cronus and the Titans C. The Rise of Zeus QuickTimeª and a decompres or are needed to see this picture. Goya paints Saturn [Cronus] Devouring His Children , 1819-23 (see Powell, pp. 90-1)
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Chapter 3, continued: The Development of Classical Myth The Classical Period The Hellenistic / Roman Period
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The Six Eras of Greek History All dates BC(E) 3000Ð1600: Early/Middle Bronze Age 1600Ð1150: Mycenaean (Late Bronze) Age 1150Ð800: Dark Age 800Ð490: Archaic Period 490Ð323: Classical Period 323Ð30: Hellenistic Period
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Greek (Athenian) Tragedy: Apex of Classical Greek Myth Directed toward the concerns of Athenian male citizens, but always couched in myth Performed at Festival of Dionysus Written scripts meant to aid actors Aristotle’s Poetics on value of tragedy cleansing of city through pity and fear hamartia = “mistake”, NOT “tragic flaw” Oedipus = great man brought down by acts he could not have prevented
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Tragic Myth vs. Philosophic Reason Tragedies draw on legendary human stories, though the gods are often active characters Lusty, violent, perverse, yet still religious context Greek science, developing at the time, viewed myth critically Greek Humanism often the target of Tragedy The world is knowable to human reason unaided by divine guidance or revelation “Man is the measure of all things”
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Greek Tragedians Aeschylus (525–456); 7 plays survive Grand moral issues; deep imagery and symbolism Sophocles (496–406); 7 plays survive Dignity of the hero caught in conflict of wills Master of the form: Oedipus the King; Antigone Euripides (485–406); 19 plays survive Irrationalist; deflated heroes; strong, passionate women; the most modern of the tragedians Aristotle judged that Sophocles showed men as they ought to be, Euripides as they are
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III. The Hellenistic / Roman Period: 323 - 30 BCE Increased effort to preserve archaic Greek myth The “Mouseion” (“Hall of the Muses”) collected Greek literature in Alexandria (in Egypt) Egypt now more central than Greece! Myth scholars and literature professors! Literature now read aloud from a written text Not necessarily “performed” in front of an audience as before, but meant to be read and reread More learned than previous performance literature This style called “Alexandrian”
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Major Hellenistic Sources of Myth Callimachus (305–240 BCE) Author of the first scientific history of literature Librarian at the Museion Apollonius of Rhodes (3 rd century BCE) His Jason and the Argonauts is in the Alexandrian style The “Library” of Apollodorus (120 CE) Compendium of Greek myths, not itself a work of literature (the ancient version of our textbook) Hyginus also wrote such a compendium, in Latin, in the 100’s CE
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ch4creation - Classics 10 Chapter 4 Spring 2010 Myths of...

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