Crt_205_Appendix_C LW Final - Appendix C 1 Appendix C...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Appendix C 1 Appendix C Lyndsey Watson Axia College of University of Phoenix CRT 205 Critical Thinking Alex Clausen February 25, 2006
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Appendix C Appendix C Article 1: ADA. (March, 2006), Diabetic Research, Retrieved on January 21, 2007, from http://www.diabetes.org Briefly state the main idea of this source or article. This article talks about type 1 diabetes and how those people can still live a long, happy, healthy lives. List three important facts that the author uses to support the main idea. 1. Type 1 diabetes is generally diagnosed in children and young adults. (ADA, 2006) 2. Having type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 1 diabetes includes: heart disease blindness, nerve damage, and kidney damage. (ADA, 2006) 3. Stop smoking, and reduce the amount of alcohol you drink can delay or prevent the onset of dangerous type 1 diabetes complications later in life. ( ADA, 2006) How credible is this source or article? Explain. This Status Report covers the ADA activities of the Department of Justice during the first quarter of 2006. This report, previous status reports, and a wide range of other ADA information are available through the Department’s Home Page at ada.gov www.ada.gov . (U.S.D.J., 2006) What rhetorical devices does the Innuendo, The form of suggestion very helpful! CRT 205 2
Image of page 2
Appendix C author use? How effective is the use of the devices? List any examples of bias, fallacies, or faulty reasoning that you found in the source or article. NONE Is the author’s argument good/bad, valid/invalid, or strong/weak? Explain. Good arguments, because Conclusions are supported by the premises. Valid, because the premises support the conclusion, and the conclusion is be true Strong, because premises are true Are any non-factual issues addressed? Is moral, legal, or aesthetic reasoning included? Explain. No, no non-factual issues addressed. Yes, moral, legal, or aesthetic reasoning, because it shows logical slips, fallacies, unfounded causal claims. Article 2: Best, Charles. (1974). Diabetes Mellitus. The World Book Encyclopedia , (Vol. 5, page 145).
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern