Expectancy Theory of Motivation

Expectancy Theory of Motivation - Expectancy Theory of...

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Expectancy Theory of Motivation Three Components Brian Culver 3/15/2010
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Motivating an employee can be difficult, as seen by the company scenario that was given. There are many varying viewpoints and opinions on how to effectively manage employees. The following paragraphs will focus on the Expectancy Theory of Motivation. According to the Expectancy Theory of Motivation there are three main motivating factors:   valence, instrumentality and expectancy. Valence is the ability of an individual’s preference to affect a particular outcome. For the valence to be positive, the person must desire to achieve the projected goal. Motivation then comes into play. An effective manager must be able to convey the overall belief that every employee’s output directly affects the company’s ability to reach its goals. The second variable is instrumentality. An employee must feel that their input is imperative for the company to succeed. There is a direct relationship between effort put in and the result of that effort. The more effort put forth by an employee the
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Expectancy Theory of Motivation - Expectancy Theory of...

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