Internet - Introduction to Internet Data Communications and...

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Introduction to Internet Data Communications and Networks become essential in computing Most networks are independent entities Internetworking has emerged that interconnect many disparate networks Internet is a loose association of thousands networks across the world The Internet technology is an open system interconnection
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Internet Architecture Opening a new era: issues and requirements End-to-End architecture Connecting everything, using any media NAT ID semantics
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End–to–End model End Systems are referred to the computers that are connected to the Internet because they sit at the edge of the Internet. The end user always interacts with the end systems. End systems do not need to know how the networks (inside the cloud) is working.
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The basic terms and concepts of building the Internet The Internet is a global system of interconnected computer networks that interchange data by packet switching using the standardized Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP). The networks are connected together through gateways or routers that relay the computer traffic between user applications (email or file transfer) that are running on the computers.
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Telecommuter Residential Cable Internet Backbone Internet Backbone xDSL xDSL , FTTH FTTH , Dial Dial Aggregation ISP’s Enterprise Enterprise Internet Architecture Transport Control Protocol (TCP) Internet Protocol (IP)
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Internet Architecture Opening a new era: issues and requirements End-to-End architecture Connecting everything, using any media NAT ID semantics
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Media Independent IPv6 TCP / UDP Internet Applications (Deployment) PHY (IEEE 802.3, 802.11, 802.16….) LLC/MAC (IEEE 802.3, 802.11, 802.16…)
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Wireless Independent Internet APPLICATIONS IPv6 layer TCP UDP Service QoS Interface Selection Handover Interface QoS Stream & Realtime Protocols ISO DSRC L7 HTTP/ SMTP Protocols MAC 802.11p WAVE Init Hnd- ovr Secur MAC 2G/3G GSM Init Hnd- ovr Secur MAC GPS/Galileo Init Hnd- ovr Secur L2/UDP
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Application Independent. .. accessible from anywhere in the world Dimmer/Switc h Human Machine Interface Securit y Camer a Motion Sensor Thermost at HVAC Valve Electroni c Ballast Control Network Over the Internet… From your browser…
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Internet Architecture Opening a new era: issues and requirements End-to-End architecture Connecting everything, using any media NAT ID semantics
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NAT: Network Address Translation 10.0.0.1 10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3 10.0.0.4 138.76.29.7 local network (e.g., home network) 10.0.0/ 24 rest of Internet Datagrams with source or destination in this network have 10.0.0/ 24 address for source, destination (as usual) All datagrams leaving local network have same single source NAT IP address: 138.76.29.7, different source port numbers
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NAT: Network Address Translation 10.0.0.1 10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3 S: 10.0.0.1, 3345 D: 128.119.40.186, 80 1 10.0.0.4 138.76.29.7 1: host 10.0.0.1 sends datagram to 128.119.40, 80 NAT translation table WAN side addr LAN side addr 138.76.29.7, 5001 10.0.0.1, 3345 …… S: 128.119.40.186, 80 D: 10.0.0.1, 3345 4 S: 138.76.29.7, 5001 D: 128.119.40.186, 80 2 2: NAT router changes datagram source addr from 10.0.0.1, 3345 to 138.76.29.7, 5001, updates table S: 128.119.40.186, 80 D: 138.76.29.7, 5001 3 3: Reply arrives dest. address: 138.76.29.7, 5001
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Internet - Introduction to Internet Data Communications and...

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