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Unformatted text preview: LIN
200:
Introduction
to
Language
‐
How
the
course
works
 MEETING
TIME
AND
PLACE
 In
Winter
2011,
LIN
200
meets
on
Thursday
evenings
,
5:10‐7:00
p.m.
in
Bahen
1160.
 
 Obligatory
tutorials
are
at
3:00
and
4:00
on
Thursdays
before
class
(but
not
the
first
week!).
 Locations
for
the
tutorial
you
registered
for
can
be
found
at:
 http://www.artsandscience.utoronto.ca/ofr/timetable/winter/lin.html.
 Contact
TAs
as
necessary
through
Blackboard.
 
 CONTACTING
THE
PROFESSOR
 Dr.
Naomi
Nagy
 Assistant
Professor,
Department
of
Linguistics

 Office:
Sid
Smith
4070

 Office
hours:
Tues
4‐5,
Thurs
2‐3,
and
by
 appointment.

 416‐978‐1767
 [email protected] 

 (Please
expect
responses
only
 during
normal
business
hours)

 During
my
scheduled
office
hours,
you
can
just
drop
 by
‐‐
no
appointment
is
needed.
If
that
time
 doesn't
work,
please
make
an
appointment.

 
 Please
 feel
 free
 to
 contact
 me
 outside
 of
 class
 if
 there
 is
 something
 you
 want
 to
 discuss
 or
 anything
you
don't
understand.
If
you
will
miss
class,
get
the
homework
AHEAD
OF
TIME
so
that
 you
 are
 not
 behind
 when
 you
 return.
 Arrange
 to
 get
 lecture
 notes
 from
 another
 student
 BEFORE
coming
to
talk
to
me
about
what
you
missed.

 
 COURSE
EXPECTATIONS
 I
expect
students
to
be
responsible
and
pro‐active
about
their
learning.
Besides
attending
 lecture
and
tutorial
each
week,
there
are
a
number
of
ways
to
make
sure
you
learn
the
material
 and
get
something
useful
out
of
the
course.
These
include:

 looking
for
examples
in
your
daily
life
of
the
phenomena
that
we
discuss
‐‐
listening
to
 how
people
talk
in
different
contexts

 participating
in
tutorials
 re‐reading
any
difficult
material
 doing
homework
promptly
 coming
to
office
hours
when
you
have
questions
 forming
study
groups
with
other
students
 using
the
Discussion
Board
feature
in
Blackboard
to
discuss
course
material
with
other
 students
and
your
TA

 READING
 We
will
discuss
most
topics
in
class.
It
is
important
to
keep
up
with
the
reading:
read
the
 chapters
listed
on
the
syllabus
before
the
date
for
which
they
are
listed.
This
way,
you
can
ask
 questions
in
class
about
anything
that
is
not
clear.
Bring
your
book
to
class
and
tutorial
every
 day.
Readings
are
from
the
required
textbook
unless
another
author
is
specified.
See
 Blackboard
for
links
to
other
readings.

 
 LIN
200:
Introduction
to
Language
‐
How
the
course
works
 2 REQUIRED
TEXTBOOK
 Denham,
K.
&
A.
Lobeck.
2010.
Linguistics
for
Everyone.
Boston:
Wadsworth.

 This
textbook
is
available
at
The
University
of
Toronto
Bookstore.

 OTHER
REQUIRED
READINGS:
[SEE
LINKS
IN
BLACKBOARD
>
CONTENT
>
ADDITIONAL
READING]
 Eschholz,
P.,
A.
Rosa
&
V.
Clark.
2005.
Taking
Notes
and
References
Sources.
 Language
Awareness:
Readings
for
College
Writers,
Ninth
ed.
Bedford
St.
 Martin’s.
655‐673.

 Willer,
Lynda.
2005.
Welcome
to
your
world,
baby.
In
K.
Walters
&
M.
 Brody.What's
language
got
to
do
with
it?
Norton.
336‐346.

 
 PARTICIPATION
 Although
it
may
be
difficult
in
a
large
lecture
hall,
students
should
try
to
participate
in
class,
 both
by
asking
and
answering
questions.
This
is
a
good
opportunity
for
you
and
the
professor
to
 see
how
it's
going
‐‐
what
is
clear
and
what
is
still
murky.
However,
your
participation
grade
 will
be
determined
by
your
participation
in
the
tutorials.
This
will
involve
hands‐on
problem‐ solving
and
time
to
ask
questions
about
the
homework
and
course
materials.
TAs
will
note
who
 participates
frequently,
as
well
as
keeping
track
of
attendance.

 
 You
are
also
strongly
encouraged
to
meet
with
the
professor
during
her
office
hours
to
discuss
 course
material
and
related
topics.
This
also
counts
toward
participation.
You
may
also
post
 items
to
the
class
via
Blackboard.
For
example,
if
you
find
an
interesting
and
linguistically‐ relevant
article
online
or
in
the
newspaper,
tell
us
about
it.

 
 HOMEWORK
 This
is
where
the
real
learning
happens‐‐when
you
get
involved
with
the
data
and
the
theory.
 There
are
two
types
of
assignments
in
this
course:
 1. Data
analysis
 • These
assignments
ask
you
to
find
and
understand
patterns
in
language,
applying
 linguistics
terminology
to
the
description
of
many
facts
that
we
(sometimes
 subconsciously)
already
know.
 • You
are
strongly
encouraged
to
work
in
pairs
on
these
non‐essay
assignments
so
you
 can
discuss
the
concepts
with
a
peer.
Hand
in
just
one
set
of
answers
with
both
students
 name
on
it
‐‐
a
name
on
the
paper
means
that
person
contributed
substantially
to
the
 analysis.
Choose
a
partner
in
the
same
tutorial.

 • Marks
for
problem‐based
assignments
are
based
primarily
on
whether
your
complete
 the
homework,
rather
than
on
how
good
your
answers
are.

 • If
you
have
clear
handwriting,
you
may
handwrite
these
assignments.
If
you
have
any
 question
about
this,
please
type.

 • Bring
two
copies
of
each
assignment
to
tutorial
‐
one
to
hand
in
and
one
to
discuss
 during
the
tutorial.

 2. Essays

 • This
course
has
been
designated
"Writing
Intensive."
This
means
that
part
of
your
 responsibility
is
to
learn
how
to
write
in
the
appropriate
academic
genre
for
the
field
of
 linguistics,
and
more
generally
for
social
science
and
humanities
research.
 LIN 200_syll_requirements.doc / Naomi Nagy January 8, 2011 LIN
200:
Introduction
to
Language
‐
How
the
course
works
 • 3 There
are
four
essay
assignments
for
this
course.
All
of
them
are
short
and
all
of
them
 require
careful
attention
to
the
details
of
how
to
write.

 • You
must
complete
these
assignments
on
your
own,
though
you
may
get
assistance
 from
many
resources
provided
by
the
University.
(In
Bb,
see
Content
>
Academic
 Resources
>
Help
with
academic
writing.)

 • Assignments
with
a
writing
focus
will
be
marked
according
to
a
rubric.
The
rubrics
are
 posted
in
Blackboard.
This
will
be
discussed
further
in
lecture
and
tutorials.
 Assignments
are
listed
in
the
syllabus.
There
are
weekly
assignments
due
at
the
start
of
your
 tutorial
on
the
Thursday
after
each
is
listed
on
the
syllabus,
except
where
otherwise
noted.
 Homework
will
be
accepted
early,
but
not
late.

 Make
sure
your
name,
student
number,and
tutorial
number
are
at
the
top
of
each
assignment.
 Please
staple
pages
together.
For
essay
assignments,
put
the
rubric
at
the
back.

 
 EXAMS
 There
will
be
a
closed‐book
mid‐term
test
and
a
final
exam
during
the
final
exam
period.
The
 midterm
will
cover
the
material
from
Weeks
1‐5.
The
Final
exam
will
be
cumulative,
but
with
a
 focus
on
the
material
covered
after
the
midterm.

 
 GRADING
 Your
grade
for
the
semester
will
be
calculated
as
shown.
Your
grade
can
go
up
or
down
 significantly
depending
on
attendance
and
participation
in
tutorials.
So,
be
there
and
join
the
 discussions!
 Homework
assignments
 Midterm
Test
 Final
Exam

 30%
 30%
 30%
 Participation
&
attendance
(in
tutorial)

10%
 
 Further
information
about
course
policies
and
procedures
is
available
in
blackboard.utoronto.ca
 Please
read
it.
Also
use
Blackboard
to
check
other
resources
and
for
updates.
Online
 information
supersedes
this
paper
version.
 LIN 200_syll_requirements.doc / Naomi Nagy January 8, 2011 LIN
200:
Introduction
to
Language
‐
How
the
course
works
 
 4 Schedule
for
LIN
200
2011
Winter
 
 Week
Date
 Topic
 Reading
 Homework

 (Due
at
the
start
of
the
tutorial
AFTER
the
 (Read
for
 date
on
which
it's
listed;

 
THIS
DAY's
class)

 unless
otherwise
noted)

 • Get
and
study
textbook
–
know
all
its
parts.
 • Study
the
class
Blackboard
site.

 • Ch.
1:
#
8,
13
(p.
25)

 Ch.
2:
#
1,
4
(p.
63)

 1
 1/13
 Introduction
 Ch.
1

 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 1/20
 1/27
 2/3
 2/10
 Ch.
2:
29‐51,
60‐61

 Language
 Acquisition

 Ch.
3
 Phonetics
 Phonology
 Morphology
I

 2/17
 Morphology
II

 Ch.
6

 &
start
Syntax

 Ch.
7:
211‐215
 3/3
 CH.
3:
#
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
10,
11
(p.
95)
 [Practice
IPA
here.]

 Ch.
4:
101‐124,
130‐132

 Ch.
4:
#
1,
5,
9,
11
(p.
133)
&

 preferred
pronunciations
essay
 Ch.
5

 Ch.
5:
#
2,
3,
4,
6,
9C,
10,
11
(p.
174)

 Ch.
6:
#
4,
12
(p.
206)

 Syntax
I:

 
 Heads
&
Phrases

 8
 3/10
 Reading
Week
2/21‐25
No
classes
 Ch.
7:215‐236
(get
a
head‐ Ch.
7:
#
1,
2
c‐f,
4
d‐f,
5,
6A,
6B,
{10
or
11},
13
 start
on
Ch.
8!)

 e‐h,
15,
16,
18
e‐j
(p.
237)
DUE
in
tut
3/17
 9
 MIDTERM
TEST
DURING
TUTORIAL
­
March
10
 Syntax
II:
Phrase
 Ch.
8:
245‐253,
256‐260
 Ch.
8:
#1
d‐g,
4
b,d,f,
7a,
11,
12
d‐g
(p.
278)

 Structure
&
Rules

 262‐277

 3/17
 Semantics
&
 Ch.
9:
307‐334
&

 Ch.
9
#
4,
5,
9,
12
(choose
5
from
a‐h),
14
(p.
 Ch.
10:
331‐342,
346‐ 313)
&
 Pragmatics

 10
 11
 12
 350
&

 slang
essay

 Eschholz
et
al.
2005
 3/24
 Sociolinguistics
 Ch.
12:
399‐406,
408‐428
 Fieldwork
essay
OR
TESOL
lesson
plan
DUE
in
 &
 tut
4/7

 Willer
2005

 3/31
 Ch.
11:
359‐368

 Ch.
11:
#
2
(p.
392)

 Historical
 4/7
 linguistics

 The
big(ger)
 Ch.
14:
465‐472,
479‐493

 
 picture

 

 

 TBA
 Review
session
to
be
scheduled
if
needed

 Final
exam
Date
&
Location
to
be
announced

 Underlined
text
has
links
in
the
online
version
of
this
syllabus.
 
 LIN 200_syll_requirements.doc / Naomi Nagy January 8, 2011 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2011 for the course LING 200 taught by Professor Naominagy during the Spring '10 term at University of Toronto.

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