opcond - In Operant Conditioning, the dog has to stand up...

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Operant Conditioning A form of learning in which a specific action (an  operant response) is made to occur either more  frequently or less frequently by manipulating its  consequences in the environment.  B.F. Skinner Operant  Response Change in  Environment Change in  response Dog  stands Gets food Dog stands  again An operant response “operates” on the environment and  causes it to change in some way. The environment, in turn, causes the behavior to  change in some way. 
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Operant Conditioning Versus Classical Conditioning In Classical Conditioning, the subject’s response has no  consequences; it produces no change in the environment. The dog gets the food after the bell is rung whether or  not he salivates to the bell. His behavior doesn’t matter.
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Unformatted text preview: In Operant Conditioning, the dog has to stand up to get the food. His behavior does matter. In other words, in Pavlov’s experiment, the food is not a reward for responding to the bell because it is given no matter what the dog does. In the Operant Conditioning example, the food is a reward because it depends on the dog’s behavior—he has to stand up. Operant Conditioning works on the Law of Effect : behavior changes according to its consequences. The Law of Effect does not apply to Classical Conditioning. Reflexes are not sensitive to their consequences. Operant Conditioning Research The “Skinner Box”...
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2011 for the course PSY270 d54633 taught by Professor Hall during the Spring '05 term at University of Phoenix.

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opcond - In Operant Conditioning, the dog has to stand up...

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