syllabus.PWAD.spr.'11

Syllabus.PWAD.spr'1 - Ethics of Peace War and Defense Classical and Contemporary Readings PHIL 272 001 Spring 2011 Dey Hall 307 TTh 3:30-4:45pm

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Ethics of Peace, War, and Defense: Classical and Contemporary Readings PHIL 272 001 Spring 2011 Dey Hall 307 TTh 3:30-4:45pm Dr. Emily Crookston [email protected] Office: Caldwell Hall # 207G Office hours: M 4:00-5:00pm, Th 9:00-10:00am, and by appointment Description Questions about the morality of war have troubled philosophers and non-philosophers throughout history and remain among the most relevant and important issues for public debate today. In this course we will take up the task of asking and answering difficult questions such as: Is going to war ever justified? What are the criteria according to which we ought to judge whether a war is being waged justly? Do the ends ever justify the means? Who ought to decide? But I have not structured the course around particular questions or problems; rather we will take a historical approach in order to better trace the progression and development of human reasoning regarding peace, war, and defense. The first part of the course deals with historical and classical approaches to the ethics of war. In the second part we will discuss some of the contemporary responses to these seminal works. The point of the course is not to provide a neat, unified account of “the Truth” about the matters under discussion. That would be a poor way to introduce the subject. Philosophy is not like physics where there is a large body of established truth; established truth, which no physicist would question and which beginners must master (the law of thermodynamics, for example). In philosophy, by contrast, everything is controversial. Professional philosophers disagree about even the most fundamental issues. However, that decidedly does not mean that there are no ‘right or wrong’ answers. Philosophy is first and last an exercise in reason; the ideas that should come out on top are the ones that have the best reasons on their sides. My hope is that you as students learn enough in this course that you can begin to assess for yourselves where the weight of reason rests. Requirements A. Participation (10%): The success and enjoyment of this and any class depends upon the involvement of its members. Please do not be afraid to share your thoughts with the class because undeveloped ideas often lead to fruitful discussion. Each student should come to class having completed the readings and being prepared to discuss the material. To that end, each student will be required to turn in a daily one-page summary of each reading assignment at the beginning of class. All summaries must be typed using a 12-point, Times New Roman or similar font, and be double-spaced with 1-inch margins. Summaries will count as
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2011 for the course PHIL 272 taught by Professor Emilycrookston during the Spring '10 term at UNC.

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Syllabus.PWAD.spr'1 - Ethics of Peace War and Defense Classical and Contemporary Readings PHIL 272 001 Spring 2011 Dey Hall 307 TTh 3:30-4:45pm

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