6.9.08 - Amy Zhang pp. 650-665 1. Was Mark Twain's...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Amy Zhang pp. 650-665 1. Was Mark Twain's description of the Gilded Age accurate? Described grants corrupt presidency He suggested a shallow glitter to characterize social and political life in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Two gradual changes occurred: first, was the development of a progression Bureaucracy. Second, after a period of close elections in a republican democratic party stalemate, new issues concerns, and parties fostered a political realignment in the 1890s. 2. What were the two most prominent national political issues during the Gilded Age? Two gradual changes occurred: first, was the development of a progression Bureaucracy. Second, after a period of close elections in a republican democratic party stalemate, new issues concerns, and parties fostered a political realignment in the 1890s. 3. How did political bosses like Blaine and Conkling run the government? They typified the moral quality of legislative leadership. Despite lying about having been paid off by the favors to railroads, Blaine was probably the most popular Republican politician of the ear. Charming, intelligent, witty, and able. Conkling was even more typical, spent most of his career bickering over patronage. 4. Why was patronage so important to both political parties? Conking opposed liberal Republican civil service reformers who wanted govt jobs based on merit rather than party loyalty. He could imagine no other purpose of political rewarding the faithful, and he accused the reformers of wanting the jobs of themselves. The two parties diverged mostly over patronage rather than principles. At stake in elections were not laws but thousands of government jobs. 5. Why was voter turnout so high during the latter part of the 19th century? The voter turnout was so high because the two parties were evenly matched and they avoided controversial stands on national issues. 6. How did the silver issue affect the distribution of currency? The large supplies of silver were mined in the west, pressure resumed for increasing the money supply b coining silver. Soft money advocates pushed for the unlimited coinage of silver in addition to gold. Despite this increase in money supply, the period was not inflationary. Prices fell disappointing supporters who pushed to coin.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
7. How did regional interests play into issues like civil service reform, silver coinage,
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/12/2011 for the course HIST 101 at Virginia Tech.

Page1 / 4

6.9.08 - Amy Zhang pp. 650-665 1. Was Mark Twain's...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online