2 Part 2 Homelessness

2 Part 2 Homelessness - NO PLACE LIKE HOME Chapter 3 What...

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NO PLACE LIKE HOME Chapter 3 What does the word “home” mean to you? The Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: Everyone has the right to an adequate standard of living, including a minimum amount of decent, affordable shelter. Along with clothing and food, housing is a material need and a home is a spiritual and cultural necessity Real Estate is in abundance for those that can afford to purchase condominiums and houses What is the housing crisis about then? In 1998 the mayors of Canada’s largest cities declared homelessness a national disaster. They noted that homelessness is a symptom of a larger crisis and that is the shortage of affordable housing in Canada.
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How do we define Homelessness? Lack of Shelter - Living on the streets (rooflessness), living in shelters (houselessness), living in inferior or inadequate housing situation Security of Shelter - Relative homelessness refers to housing situations that do not meet basic health and safety standards, access to employment, education, health care etc Duration: chronic - living in shelters or on the streets episodic - moving in and out of shelters and temporary places to stay situational - life situations such as family violence/job loss seasonal - seeking housing during bad weather conditions transitory - living in emergency shelter a month or two then leaving for good
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Street Health Report 2007 In total 368 adults were surveyed over a 3 month period. They were a representative sample of 368 homeless adults at meal programs and shelters in downtown Toronto They were asked to answer questions about their health and access to health care. For the purposes of the study “homeless” was identified as: having stayed in a shelter; outdoors or in a public space; or with a friend or relative for 10 or more days in the 30 days prior to being surveyed. Age: Ranged from 19 – 66 years 77% were 25 – 49 (compared with 49% being this age in the general population) 20% were 50+ (compared with 32% of general population) 3% were 18 – 24 (compared with 12% of general population)
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Race or Cultural Background 70% - white/caucasian 15% - Black or African-Canadian 15% - Aboriginal or First Nations 4% - Hispanic 2% - East Asian 1% - South Asian 1% - South East Asian 1% - West Asian Note: There was a smaller proportion of visible minorities in our survey sample than in the general population of Toronto, where visible minorities make up 44%.
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Street Health Report Education: - The homeless people interviewed had less education than the general population - High School graduate – 53% (90% in general pop) - College or university graduate – 12% (61% in general pop)
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Street Health Report Main reasons preventing homeless people from finding and maintaining housing: - Economic – 78% - Mental and physical health conditions – 33% - Lack of suitable housing (unsafe/poor conditions) 24% - Housing waiting list too long – 11%
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2011 for the course SOC 136 taught by Professor I during the Spring '10 term at Seneca.

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2 Part 2 Homelessness - NO PLACE LIKE HOME Chapter 3 What...

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