3 Lost in the Supermarket

3 Lost in the Supermarket - Chapter #4 Lost in the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter #4 Lost in the Supermarket The word “economy” comes from the Greek word referring to household management People get paid for the work they do and they spend the money earned on personal/household needs Economic system: involves earning money for work performed and exchanging money for what people want In the money economy “growth” is a measure of increases in national income, employment or consumption.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Economy continued This growth may or may not contribute to environmental or human well-being For example: In instances where there are disasters (oil spill such as the Exxon Valdez in 1989) the economy may be stimulated to contain the disaster with crews of people involved in the clean up Work carried out by care givers (socially important work) excluded in economic measures
Background image of page 2
Wages When people’s wages are low and their jobs are not secure they must spend more hours working to participate in the market economy Working longer hours for low pay means they will spend more hours away from the family in order to earn a living to support their family When people spend less time at home they will look to conveniences such as fast food to make life easier Money earned through labour will be spent in the marketplace What is the cost to human well being in our market economy?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Markets Part of human societies where people got together to socialize,barter, buy and sell products Today we buy groceries in stores: lots of variety and quantities Now packaging tells us ingredients/% of fat, calories etc “meal solutions” (box food like Kraft dinner)
Background image of page 4
Supermarkets The average American meal is travelling over 1,500 miles to get to the table. Canadian produce is competing with: Mexican strawberries, Honduran bananas, Moroccan oranges, Indian tea…… Canada imports food and agricultural products from half the countries in the world Between 1995 and 1999 shipments into Canada increased 40% Increased import growth in food and agricultural products (food, fibres such as cotton/wool, fuels, flowers, plants, fish and birds, tobacco, resins, plastics and pharmaceuticals) Trend in globalization reflected in import growth in food and agricultural products
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Supermarkets If you can pay the price, “nothing is out of season at the supermarket” What is this costing Canadians in terms of nutritional costs, environmental costs and costs to farmers in Canada and abroad? The book quotes economic theorists Milton and Rose Friedman
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/12/2011 for the course SOC 136 taught by Professor I during the Spring '10 term at Seneca.

Page1 / 24

3 Lost in the Supermarket - Chapter #4 Lost in the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online