4 notes chapters 5 and 6

4 notes chapters 5 and 6 - Chapter #5 World of Work s s s s...

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Chapter #5 World of Work In North America “what we do for a living” defines us In Canada our identities are linked to our jobs Being “unemployed” is stigmatizing Your income impacts your lifestyle/ability to purchase goods and services A “good” job means comfort, social status and self- worth in our society
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Unemployment Rates in 2006 7.5% in Toronto 6.3% in Ontario and nationally In Toronto, jobs in service sectors (trade, transportation, financial, real estate, commercial, arts and entertainment, health care and education) comprised 84.1% of employment in 2006
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Unemployment Rate Refers to those actively seeking work What about those working P/T but wanting F/T, those waiting to be recalled back to work or those who have given up? If these people are factored in the rate of unemployment leaps to 9.1%
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Unemployment cont’d The monthly unemployment rate from Statistics Canada is the barometer of economic health Since the 1980’s there have been significant changes in the labour market: technology, more P/T jobs, self-employment rose by 40%, changes to Employment Insurance (fewer qualify for EI/drop from 87% in 1990 to 42% in 1997)
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Social Assistance Those who do not qualify for EI may resort to Social Assistance to survive Stigma associated with collecting Social Assistance
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Regional Differences Easier to find work in more prosperous areas Difficult in Atlantic Canada, parts of Quebec and Northern Canada Higher rates of employment in: Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver
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Alberta Many from the Eastern provinces have left to find work in the oil sands plants of Alberta Low rates of unemployment tend to drive up labour costs because workers are free to leave low wage jobs for other better paying jobs High unemployment makes it difficult for young people to find work
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Impact of unemployment The unemployment rate is higher for minority groups, the disabled and young people For Aboriginal people in Canada the unemployment rates are three times higher than the average for non Aboriginal Canadians Aboriginal people who are employed earn 34% below the Canadian average Visible minority workers earn 15% less on average The jobless rate for youth aged 15 - 24 was 12.6% compared to the average of 6.8%
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1920’s, 1930’s and 1940’s Gave way to the Great Depression of the 1930’s The 1930’s : bread lines, work camps and hard times in Canada Followed by WW II Baby Boom, housing boom, jobs (meant workers made gains with employers) 1950’s good economically
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1980’s Unemployment has risen steadily since the 1960’s Recession No bread lines and soup kitchens - foodbanks replaced these Foodbanks a permanent feature in our country Canada is moving towards greater unemployment not less
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The Crisis of Unemployment Unemployment is not limited to Canada alone but is a global issue Affected by the emergence of the information age and the growing service economy Information is shifted instantaneously around the world
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Who is to Blame? Blaming unemployment on the unemployed
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2011 for the course SOC 136 taught by Professor I during the Spring '10 term at Seneca.

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4 notes chapters 5 and 6 - Chapter #5 World of Work s s s s...

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