tg02 - MODELING A MIXING ELBOW (2-D) 2. MODELING A MIXING...

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MODELING A MIXING ELBOW (2-D) © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 2-1 2. MODELING A MIXING ELBOW (2-D) In this tutorial, you will use GAMBIT to create the geometry for a mixing elbow and then generate a mesh. The mixing elbow configuration is encountered in piping systems in power plants and process industries. It is often important to predict the flow field and temperature field in the neighborhood of the mixing region in order to properly design the location of inlet pipes. In this tutorial you will learn how to: Create vertices using a grid system Create arcs by selecting the center of curvature and the endpoints of the arc Create straight edges between vertices Split an arc using a vertex point Create faces from edges Specify the distribution of nodes on an edge Create structured meshes on faces Set boundary types Prepare the mesh to be read into FLUENT 4 Export a mesh 2.1 Prerequisites This tutorial assumes that you have worked through Tutorial 1 and you are consequently familiar with the GAMBIT interface.
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Problem Description MODELING A MIXING ELBOW (2-D) 2-2 © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 2.2 Problem Description The problem to be considered is shown schematically in Figure 2-1. A cold fluid enters through the large pipe and a warmer fluid enters through the small pipe. The two fluids mix in the elbow. 16 32 32 16 4 12 39.93° v T 1 1 , v T 2 2 , v T out out , Figure 2-1: Problem specification
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MODELING A MIXING ELBOW (2-D) Strategy © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 2-3 2.3 Strategy In this tutorial, you will build a 2-D mesh using a “bottom-up” approach (in contrast to the “top-down” approach used in Tutorial 1). The “bottom-up” approach means that you will first create some vertices, connect the vertices to create edges, and connect the edges to make faces (in 3-D, you would stitch the faces together to create volumes). While this process by its very nature requires more steps, the result is, just as in Tutorial 1, a valid geometry that can be used to generate the mesh. The mesh created in this tutorial is intended for use in FLUENT 4, so it must be a single block, structured mesh. However, this mesh can also be used in any of the other Fluent solvers. This type of mesh is sometimes called a mapped mesh, because each grid point has a unique I, J, K index. In order to meet this criterion, certain additional steps must be performed in GAMBIT and are illustrated in this tutorial. After creating the straight edges and arcs that comprise the geometry, you will create two faces: one for the main flow passage (the elbow) and one for the smaller inlet duct. The mesh is generated for the larger face using the Map scheme; this requires that the number of grid nodes be equal on opposite edges of the face. You will force GAMBIT to use the Map scheme to mesh the smaller face as well. Several other features are also demonstrated in this tutorial:
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tg02 - MODELING A MIXING ELBOW (2-D) 2. MODELING A MIXING...

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