tg03 - MODELING A THREE-PIPE INTERSECTION(3-D 3 MODELING A...

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MODELING A THREE-PIPE INTERSECTION (3-D) © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 3-1 3. MODELING A THREE-PIPE INTERSECTION (3-D) This tutorial employs “primitives”—that is, predefined GAMBIT modeling components and procedures. There are two types of GAMBIT primitives: Geometry Mesh Geometry primitives are volumes possessing standard shapes—such as bricks, cylinders, and spheres. Mesh primitives are standard mesh configurations. In this tutorial, you will use geometry primitives to create a three-pipe intersection. You will decompose this geometry into four parts and add boundary layers. Finally, you will mesh the three-pipe intersection and will employ a mesh primitive to mesh one part of the decomposed geometry. In this tutorial you will learn how to: Create volumes by defining their dimensions Split a volume Use GAMBIT journal files Add boundary layers to your geometry Prepare the mesh to be read into POLYFLOW 3.1 Prerequisites This tutorial assumes you have worked through Tutorial 1 and you are consequently familiar with the GAMBIT interface.
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Problem Description MODELING A THREE-PIPE INTERSECTION (3-D) 3-2 © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 3.2 Problem Description The problem to be considered is shown schematically in Figure 3-1. The geometry consists of three intersecting pipes, each with a diameter of 6 units and a length of 4 units. The three pipes are orthogonal to each other. The geometry can be represented as three intersecting cylinders and a sphere octant at the corner of the intersection. 10 6 Figure 3-1: Problem specification
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MODELING A THREE-PIPE INTERSECTION (3-D) Strategy © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 3-3 3.3 Strategy In this tutorial, you will quickly create the basic geometry for a three-pipe intersection. The basic geometry can be automatically meshed with tetrahedra, but your goal in this tutorial is to create a conformal, hexahedral mesh for POLYFLOW, which requires some decomposition of the geometry before meshing. Thus, the tutorial shows some of the typi- cal procedures for decomposing a complicated geometry into “meshable” volumes. The first decomposition involves using a brick to split off a portion of the three-pipe inter- section. The resulting volume is described as a sphere “octant” (one-eighth of a sphere) residing in the corner of the intersection, as shown in Figure 3-2. This volume, which is very similar in shape to a tetrahedron, will therefore be meshed using GAMBIT’s Tet Primitive scheme. Note that this creates a hexahedral mesh in a tetrahedral topology; it does not create tetrahedral cells. Figure 3-2: Decomposition of the three-pipe intersection geometry The remaining geometry is then split into three parts, one for each pipe, as shown in Figure 3-1. To do this, you will create an edge and three faces that are used to split the volume into the required three parts. These volumes are meshed using GAMBIT’s Cooper scheme (described in detail in the GAMBIT Modeling Guide). This tutorial illustrates three different ways to specify the source faces required by the Cooper scheme.
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