tg07 - MODELING FLOW IN A TANK 7. MODELING FLOW IN A TANK...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MODELING FLOW IN A TANK © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 7-1 7. MODELING FLOW IN A TANK In this tutorial you will utilize the techniques illustrated in the previous tutorials to create a complex pipe junction that represents a real-world example of flow in a process tank. In this tutorial you will learn how to: Create cylinders and bricks by defining their dimensions Translate and rotate volumes Perform Boolean operations on volumes (unite and subtract) Split a volume using another volume Align two volumes using a vertex pair Specify the distribution of nodes on an edge Add boundary layers to your geometry Generate an unstructured hexahedral mesh Examine the quality of the mesh Prepare the mesh to be read into FIDAP 7.1 Prerequisites This tutorial assumes that you have worked through Tutorials 1, 2, 3, and 4.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Problem Description MODELING FLOW IN A TANK 7-2 © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 7.2 Problem Description The problem to be considered is shown schematically in Figure 7-1. Due to symmetry, only half of the actual model is shown. The geometry consists of a large cylindrical tank with an inlet/outlet annular section. This section is connected to the tank at half the length of the tank and at an offset from the center of the tank. In the annular section, the inner pipe is the inlet pipe. There is a small T-junction on the upper end of outer pipe. This is the outlet. The overall goal is to create a high quality hexahedral mesh including boundary layers and edge meshing to sufficiently capture gradient in solution variables, such as velocity and temperature. The solver selected for this tutorial is FIDAP 80 60 72 84 12 12 26 8 17 Figure 7-1: Problem specification
Background image of page 2
MODELING FLOW IN A TANK Strategy © Fluent Inc., Sep-04 7-3 7.3 Strategy In this tutorial we will combine several of the previously shown tools and strategies and apply them on a real industrial problem. The first thing to find out is if the boundary con- dition and the physics will allow us to model only half of the geometry. This is a very important step since it immediately reduces the effort of preprocessing and running time. After confirming the symmetry condition, we start building the geometry using primitives and Boolean operations. Although we normally recommend to create the model in the following order: 1. Geometry creation 2. Decomposition 3. Mesh generation We will illustrate, in this journal, that the order of geometry creation and decomposition is not strict. Mesh generation, though, should in all cases be left to last. The overall geometry creation is fairly straightforward and based on cylinder primitives, Boolean unites, and subtracts. The model cannot be meshed as is, using hexahedral meshing, since several faces in this model are non-trivial and their normals are facing all three major directions. Essentially there are two pipe-pipe intersections, which needs to be decomposed The first section is the pipe/annulus intersection at the outlet. In this situation, the recom-
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/13/2011 for the course MECHANICAL ME:5208 taught by Professor P.k.lele during the Spring '10 term at Jadavpur University.

Page1 / 72

tg07 - MODELING FLOW IN A TANK 7. MODELING FLOW IN A TANK...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online