Dale - Computer Science Illuminated 92

Dale - Computer Science Illuminated 92 - To accomplish...

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Figure 3.6 A few characters in the Unicode character set 3.3 Representing Text 65 Also note that the first 32 characters in the ASCII character chart do not have a simple character representation that you could print to the screen. These characters are reserved for special purposes such as carriage return and tab. These characters are usually interpreted in special ways by what- ever program is processing the information. The Unicode Character Set The extended version of the ASCII character set provides 256 characters, which is enough for English but not enough for international use. This limitation gave rise to the Unicode character set, which has a much stronger international influence. The goal of the people who created Unicode is nothing less than to represent every character in every language used in the entire world, including all of the Asian ideograms. It also represents many additional special-purpose characters such as scientific symbols.
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Unformatted text preview: To accomplish this, the Unicode character set uses 16 bits per character. Therefore, the Unicode character set can represent 2 16 , or over 65 thou-sand, characters. Compare that to the 256 characters represented in the extended ASCII set. The Unicode character set is gaining popularity and is used by many programming languages and computer systems today. However, the char-acter set itself is still evolving. Not all of the available codes have been assigned to particular characters. Figure 3.6 shows a few select characters currently represented in the Unicode character set. For consistency, Unicode was designed to be a superset of ASCII. That is, the first 256 characters in the Unicode character set correspond exactly Character Source Code (Hex) 0041 042F OE09 13EA 211E 21CC 282F 345F English (Latin) Russian (Cyrillic) Thai Cherokee Letterlike Symbols Arrows Braille A R Chinese/Japanese/ Korean (Common)...
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2011 for the course CSE 1550 taught by Professor Marianakant during the Fall '10 term at York University.

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