Dale - Computer Science Illuminated 387

Dale - Computer Science Illuminated 387 - path may be...

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Path A text designa- tion of the location of a file or subdirectory in a file system Absolute path A path that begins at the root and includes all succes- sive subdirectories Relative path A path that begins at the current working directory 360 Chapter 11 File Systems and Directories Figure 11.5 A Unix directory tree / bin cat grep Is tar dev ttyE71 ttyE72 sdn10 sdn11 etc localtime profile named.conf sysconfig clock keyboard mail access domaintable access.old home donations to do.txt schedule smith jones week1.txt week2.txt week3.txt wait.2.gz umask.2.gz socket.2.gz reports man2 utilities printall combine sort2 usr man local man1 exit.1.gz is.1.gz tail.1.gz man2 wait.2.gz unmask.2.gz socket.2.gz bin nslookup host games fortune zork To indicate a particular file using text, we specify that file’s path , which is the series of directories through which you must go to find the file. A
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Unformatted text preview: path may be absolute or relative. An absolute path name begins at the root and specifies each step down the tree until it reaches the desired file or directory. A relative path name begins from the current working directory. Lets look at examples of each type of path. The following are absolute path names based on the directory tree shown in Figure 11.4: 10hx! x,F D#z C) .""DOz2D 2!xTizdz 10C> 8!ORFz 9 #z99zx ,II#DO,9D! S,LzOiT!O 102D T! )> 9zFURDOLDFz They each begin at the root and proceed down the directory structure. Each subdirectory is separated by the backslash ( ). Note that a path can...
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