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Le09 - ME 200 Thermodynamics I Lecture 9 Evaluating...

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ME 200: Thermodynamics I Lecture 9: Evaluating properties Reading: Sections 3.1-3.3; SP9, 3.6, 3.7 9/13/2010 1 ME200 Therm I Lecture 09, Prof. Mongia Professor Hukam Mongia Office Hours: MWF 9:30 to 10:30 AM in ME 83 Other times email for appointment; Phone: 765-494-5640 Course Website: https://engineering.purdue.edu/ME200/ Course Secretaries: Diana Akers (ME 84) and Marilyn Morrison (ME 100) Grader: Abhro Pal , [email protected]
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9/13/2010 2 Let us recall 1 st : 0 th Law of Thermodynamics and property of water gave us definition of temperature, T. Pascal gave us definition of pressure p=Force/Area Newton’s 2 nd law of motion (when simplified to one- dimension, along with definition of pressure) gave definition of work: ME200 Therm I Lecture 09, Prof. Mongia
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9/13/2010 3 Joule’s experiment gave us the property, Internal Energy: U 2 -U 1 =Q-W =-W adiabatic Energy balance on a closed system gave us: ME200 Therm I Lecture 09, Prof. Mongia 0
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9/13/2010 4 Heat transfer rates by conduction, convection and radiation given by: How many properties (p, T, v, ----) we need to measure/calculate? ME200 Therm I Lecture 09, Prof. Mongia
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9/13/2010 5 State Principal So far we have seen that energy of a closed system can be varied independently by heat or work . Heat can be varied through heat transfer, which is a function of temperature (I need to know T or equivalent property). Energy/work interaction requires properties ( p, v ). Experimentally we found that in many thermodynamic problems there are only two independent properties (others are dependent properties), then such a system is called a simple system.
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