lecture14 - Electrical Work and Power Electrical Electrical...

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Electrical Work and Power Electrical Work and Power
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Electrical Work and Power Electrical Work and Power I I + - Higher V 1 Lower V 2 Resistance R Current I flows through a potential difference V Follow a charge Q : at positive end, U 1 = QV 1 at negative end, U 2 = QV 2 P.E. Decreases: 0 U Q V = < The speed of the charges is constant in the wires and resistor. What is electrical potential energy converted to?
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Electrical resistance converts electrical potential energy to thermal energy (heat), just as friction in mechanical systems converts mechanical energy to heat. This thermal energy means the atoms in the conductor move faster and so the conductor gets hotter. The average kinetic energy of the electrons doesn’t increase once the current reaches a steady state; the electrons lose energy in collisions with the atoms as fast as it is supplied by the field.
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Power dissipated by a resistor: Power dissipated by a resistor: ( ) U Q V P IV t t = = = Power dissipated= current x potential difference
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2011 for the course PHYSICS Physics 1E taught by Professor Venus during the Winter '03 term at McMaster University.

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lecture14 - Electrical Work and Power Electrical Electrical...

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