u3r-jacobson_guide

u3r-jacobson_guide - MUS
355
American
Music
...

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Unformatted text preview: MUS
355
American
Music
 Unit
3
 “Race
and
Music”
Module
 
 Reading
guide
text
for
Matthew
Frye
Jacobson,
Whiteness
of
a
Different
Color,
 Chapter
3.
 
 This
reading
is
taken
from
an
important
study
of
race
in
the
United
States.

It
tells
 the
story
of
how
various
white
races
were
consolidated
under
the
term
“Caucasian”
 in
the
early
20th
century.

Importantly
for
our
purposes,
Jacobson
draws
special
 attention
to
the
role
that
music,
including
the
performance
by
Al
Jolson
in
the
first
 commercial
sound
film
“The
Jazz
Singer”
(1927),
played
in
this
process.

Jolson
was
 one
of
the
most
popular
entertainers
of
his
time,
a
household
name
and
a
towering
 figure
in
the
entertainment
industry.

As
you
will
see,
the
prominent
film’s
 combination
of
musical
performance,
blackface,
jazz,
and
Jewish
identity
place
it
at
 the
center
of
American
race
relations
in
the
late
1920s.

This
chapter
is
on
the
 lengthy
side,
so
I
recommend
reading
with
this
guide
in
mind.


 
 Take
detailed
notes
on
the
article
as
it
relates
to
the
following
questions:
 
 What
was
the
difference
between
“white”
and
“Caucasian”
in
the
mid‐20th
 century?
 
 What
factors
helped
to
make
distinction
between
white
races
less
important
 (and
the
differences
between
“black”
and
“white”
more
important)
after
 World
War
I?
 
 How
did
scientific
discussions
of
race
change
between
World
War
I
and
 World
War
II?
 
 What
is
the
difference
between
studying
“race”
and
studying
“race
relations?”
 
 What
role
does
race
play
in
the
assimilation
story
of
The
Jazz
Singer?

How
 does
the
film
associate
specific
musical
styles
or
songs
with
race
identity?


 
 How
do
the
ideas
and
history
discussed
in
this
article
relate
to
the
genres
you
 studied
in
Unit
2?
 
 
 
 
 ...
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