u3r-zack_guide

u3r-zack_guide -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Reading
Guide
to
Naomi
Zack’s
“Black,
White,
and
Gray
Words:
Words,
Words,
 Words”
in
‘Mixed
Race’
Studies:
A
Reader,
153‐157
(ed.
Jayne
O.
Ifekwunigwe,
 London:
Routledge,
2004).
 In
this
short
reading
Naomi
Zack
draws
attention
to
the
“black‐white
dichotomy”
 and
the
language
used
when
discussing
race
in
America.
Please
consider
the
 following
questions:
 • • • • What
is
the
“black‐white
dichotomy?”
 What
is
the
“black‐white
sin‐virtue
dichotomy?”
How
can
we
correlate
this
 dichotomy
to
the
music
discussed
in
Unit
2?

 What
is
the
significance
of
capitalizing
the
first
letter
of
a
name
when
 discussing
racial
categories?
 On
page
155,
Zack
states:
“So
it
is
fairly
clear
that
the
racial
words
“black”
 and
“white”
are
not
the
color
words
that
they
purport
to
be
but
labels
that
 refer
to
nineteenth‐century
concepts
of
race,
which
associated
nonphysical
 characteristics
with
racial
designations.”
What
is
the
significance
of
this
 statement?
 On
page
156,
Zack
states:
“However,
it
is
not
racial‐group
membership
that
 determines
race
in
the
United
States,
but
lines
of
descent
–
genealogy.
As
 groups,
races
are
not
stable
entities.”
What
does
she
mean
in
this
last
 sentence?
 • Please
also
consider
the
questions
presented
at
the
end
of
the
chapter
on
page
157:
 • • • • 
 
 How
does
Zack
illustrate
the
ways
in
which
‘the
mythology
about
race
.
.
.
is
 evident
in
the
language
of
race
that
is
used
in
the
United
States?
 Why
is
she
critical
of
the
terms
‘black’
and
‘white’?
 What
does
the
author
mean
by
the
statement:
‘it
is
not
racial‐group
 membership
that
determines
race
in
the
United
States
but
lines
of
descent‐ genealogy’?
 What
‘term’
does
she
advocate
and
why?
 ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online