T1a10p - expansion(Fig P10.55a If the temperature increases...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Assignment 10 Problems(Fall Term Physics 102) (Not to be handed in) 12. A grandfather clock is controlled by a swinging brass pendulum that is 1.3 m long at a temperature of 20°C. (a) What is the length of the pendulum rod when the temperature drops to 0.0°C? (b) If a pendulum’s period is given by g L T / 2 π = where L is its length, does the change in length of the rod cause the clock to run fast or slow? L = 1.3 m – 0.49 mm 15. A brass ring of diameter 10.00 cm at 20.0°C is heated and slipped over an aluminum rod of diameter 10.01 cm at 20.0°C. Assuming the average coefficients of linear expansion are constant, (a) to what temperature must this combination be cooled to separate them? Is this attainable? (b) What if the aluminum rod is 10.02 cm in diameter? a) T = -179 C, b) T = -376 C 55. Two concrete spans of a 250-m-long bridge are placed end to end so that no room is allowed for
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: expansion (Fig P10.55a). If the temperature increases by 20.0°C, what is the height y to which the spans rise when they buckle (Fig. 10.55a)? y = 2.74 m FIGURE P10.55 16. If 200 g of water is contained in a 300-g aluminum vessel at 10°C and an additional 100 g of water at 100°C is poured into the container, what is the final equilibrium temperature of the mixture? T f = 35 C 24. A 3.00-g lead bullet at 30.0°C is fired at a speed of 240 m/s into a large block of ice at 0°C, in which it embeds itself. What quantity of ice melts? m = .294 g 51. A 40-g ice cube floats in 200 g of water in a 100-g copper cup; all are at a temperature of 0°C. A piece of lead at 98°C is dropped into the cup, and the final equilibrium temperature is 12°C. What is the mass of the lead? m = 2.3 kg...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/15/2011 for the course PHYS 102 taught by Professor Vandenberg during the Fall '08 term at University of Victoria.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online