Lecture 08-Body Effect & Common Gate

Lecture 08-Body Effect & Common Gate - Lecture 8...

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EE 214 Lecture 8 (HO#12) B. Murmann 1 Lecture 8 Body Effect Common Gate Stage Boris Murmann Stanford University murmann@stanford.edu Copyright © 2004 by Boris Murmann
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EE 214 Lecture 8 (HO#12) B. Murmann 2 Overview Reading – 1.6.6 (Body Transconductance) – 3.3.4, 7.2.4.2 (Common Gate Stage) – 3.4.2.2, 7.3.4 (up to p. 526) (Cascode Stage) Introduction – Having completed our discussion of simple common source amplifiers, we now continue by exploring alternative ways of forming and using single transistor stages. First, we will look at the common base stage, followed by a discussion of the common drain stage in future lectures. While CS stages can usually be configured with source and substrate nodes tied together, this is often not the case in the CG and CD configurations. Hence, we'll first need to take a look at the so called "body effect," which becomes significant in this context. Somewhat tedious to read…
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EE 214 Lecture 8 (HO#12) B. Murmann 3 The "Atoms" of Analog Circuit Design As we've seen from the discussion so far, a common source stage is sufficient for building a simple amplifier – How about the other two possible configurations? We'll find that common gate and drain stages can be incorporated as valuable add-ons, for building "better" amplifiers Interestingly, many analog circuits can be decomposed into a combination of the above three fundamental building blocks Common Source Common Gate Common Drain
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EE 214 Lecture 8 (HO#12) B. Murmann 4 Body Connection In the EE214 (N-well) technology, only the PMOS device has an isolated body connection Newer technologies (e.g. 0.13 µ m CMOS) also tend to have NMOS devices with isolated body ("twin-well" process)
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EE 214 Lecture 8 (HO#12) B. Murmann 5 Body Connection Scenarios Can connect body to source or V DD V DD NMOS PMOS
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B. Murmann 6
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2011 for the course EE 214 taught by Professor Murmann,b during the Spring '04 term at Stanford.

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Lecture 08-Body Effect & Common Gate - Lecture 8...

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