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Gero 310 F'09 neuro 1

Gero 310 F'09 neuro 1 - Nervous system normal physiology...

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Nervous system: normal physiology Nervous system: normal physiology • defined in terms of discrete divisions, regions, structures - however, operates as a whole throughout entire body • closely interacts with all other systems in the body - receives info & directs actions -explain central nervous system or the systems and how it works Chp 6
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Overview of nervous system 1) central nervous system (CNS) Two primary divisions 1) central nervous system 2) peripheral nervous system composition : brain & spinal cord function : central receiving - processing - transmitting - all tissues send information to the brain - info received by brain is processed, leading to a decision/response - directions for carrying out response are transmitted to appropriate tissue(s)
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design : -protected by bone encasement * spinal cord = vertebrae * brain = skull - further isolated & protected by meninges * 3-layer covering between bone & tissue * part of the blood-brain-barrier that restricts entry into the CNS * meninges are bathed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which also flows inside brain ventricles - CSF provides cushion support, waste removal
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Organization of the brain Organization of the brain • in early development, CNS is a tube - lengthens, develops at distal end (brain) -like a rosebud, stuff moving into the stem There is a whole in the center of the middle tube, CFS moves in the middle of it -CFS on outside, but also in the inside of the canal of the spinal cord and inside the brain faculty.washington.edu/ chudler/dev.html
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• gross anatomy of brain major division subdivision key structures forebrain forebrain telencephalon telencephalon cerebrum, limbic cerebrum, limbic faculty.washington.edu/ chudler/dev.html diencephalon diencephalon thalamus, hypothalamus thalamus, hypothalamus Hypothalamus - **Endocrine system
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midbrain mesencephalon colliculi, peduncles • gross anatomy of brain major division subdivision key structures faculty.washington.edu/ chudler/dev.html
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hindbrain rhombencephalon pons, medulla (met-/myel-) cerebellum • gross anatomy of brain major division subdivision key structures faculty.washington.edu/ chudler/dev.html
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• brain regions are inter-connected by highly complex and as yet incompletely defined circuitry • complex circuitry suggests specific neural functions likely involve interactions between multiple brain regions • nonetheless, strong evidence that many functions can be strongly associated with specific brain regions -Cortex involves six layers -Gyri are the mountains and sulci is the spaces between them -The six layer is important to advanced processing – the more neocortex you have the more processing you can do -The layers are long are folded back into itself to cram more of it in there -size of the sulci get larger with aging
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brain region anatomy neocortex - separated into lobes: prefrontal, (cerebrum) frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital - six cell layers deep: increase amount by folding layers (gyri & sulci) - organized into vertical columns
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temporal lobe parietal lobe frontal lobe - Frontal
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