Christian_Stephens_-_Compromise_of_1850_Simulation - Name...

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Name: Nathan Taylor, Leslie Mobley, Kason Sprinkle, Christian Stephens The Compromise of 1850 Background: Introduction to the Crisis & Compromise of 1850 In 1850, tensions between the north and south came to a head after the Mexican-American War. The war itself had already been divisive, but tensions increased when California asked to be admitted to the Union and Congress had to decide whether the vast lands from the Mexican Cession would be free or slave states. The South also wanted a stronger fugitive slave law, while many abolitionists wanted to see slavery abolished in Washington, DC. Several senators played major roles in the creation and passage of the Compromise of 1850 – Senator Henry Clay (Whig from Kentucky), Senator Stephen Douglas (Democrat from Illinois), and Daniel Webster (Democrat from Massachusetts). On January 29, 1850, Henry Clay, known as the "Great Compromiser” and author of the Missouri Compromise, proposed a compromise to settle the issues over the new territory won in the Mexican War. The resolutions attempted to please both sides, especially when it came to slavery. They included a few key issues that we will analyze today: (1) admitting California as a free state, (2) organizing the Utah and New Mexico territories, 3) passing a more effective fugitive slave law (4) outlawing the slave trade (but not slavery) in Washington D.C.. Clay's proposal for compromise triggered a massive debate in the Senate that would come to be called "the Great Debate." Stephen Douglas divided the bill into several individual bills so that senators could vote on individual bills that were then put together to make the Compromise of 1850. The stakes are high. 9 southern states have already met in Nashville to consider secession if Congress bans slavery in new territories. State of the Union Timeline 1846 • President Polk & Congress declare war on Mexico over the disputed Republic of Texas • The Wilmot Proviso: any territory added to the Union after the Mexican- American War would be admitted as a free state. The Wilmot Proviso failed to pass in Congress • Iowa was admitted as a free state. 1848 • Mexican-American War ended and U.S. gained territory from Texas to Arizona.

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