chap001 - Chapter 1 An Introduction to Integrated...

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Chapter 1 An Introduction to Integrated Enterprise Information Systems Review Questions R1. What does it mean to have a stovepiped enterprise? In a stovepiped enterprise, each functional area is relatively isolated from the other functional areas and decisions may be made without a realization of how they may affect the other functional areas. The isolation of functional areas need not be physical; two departments that are physically located on the same floor of the same building may not fully understand each other’s operations and objectives, nor how they fit together within the broad scope of the enterprise. R2. What does it mean to have stovepiped systems? In a stovepiped system, data and processes within each system or software application are relatively isolated from each other and data is typically stored separately in each. Changes made in one system to data that is also stored in other systems do not get made in the others. Redundancy leads to inconsistency and to poor decision support. R3. What are some impediments enterprises may encounter in their efforts to integrate their information systems? Resistance to change is the main impediment enterprises will face. Integration is likely to require at least some of the people in the enterprise to learn a new software application because of the need to switch to a common set of building blocks. If new software is not available or cannot be implemented, then impediments may include differences in operating systems, the need to build bridges between the existing systems, cost, and so forth. R4. What does the phrase “paving the cowpaths” mean with respect to re-engineering? Hammer describes paving the cowpaths as the embedding of outdated processes in silicon and software. That is, enterprises simply use technology to seed up existing processes without considering whether the processes themselves need to be changed. Solutions Manual to accompany Dunn, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e 1
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Chapter 1 R5. What are three common types of integration attempts currently used by enterprises? One common type of integration in enterprise systems is the manual transfer of information from one system into another, e.g. printing the data from one system and re-keying it into the other, or downloading it into a generic format from the one system and uploading it into the other system. A second common type of integration in enterprise systems is the automated transfer of information from one system into another via the use of program code that forms bridges between the disparate systems. This approach is similar to the manual download and upload of information from one system to the other. Best of breed software is an example of this type of integration. A third common type of integration in enterprise systems is the use of single
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2011 for the course INFO SYSTE 115 taught by Professor Baker during the Spring '10 term at Strayer.

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chap001 - Chapter 1 An Introduction to Integrated...

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