Chap002 - Chapter 2, Representation and Patterns: An...

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Chapter 2, Representation and Patterns: An Introduction to the REA Enterprise Ontology True/False Questions 1. Representation and modeling are important for understanding enterprise information systems. Ans: True 2. The more closely a model resembles the real thing it represents, the better the model is. Ans: True 3. Representations are created only at the type level of abstraction. Ans: False Response: representations may be created at different levels of abstraction, including the type and token levels. 4. A token is a category of objects. Ans: False Response: a token is an individual object, a type is a category of objects. 5. Because a token represents an individual object, there can be only one way to represent each token in a model. Ans: False Response: for example, the square shape may be represented by using the word square or by drawing a square, as in exhibit 2-1. 6. Reality-to-category mapping is a very important concept in building enterprise system models to make the complexity of representing thousands of objects manageable. Ans: True 7. Patterns allow us to make predictions about future events and to make sense of the present based on our past experiences. Ans: True 12 Dunn/Cherrington/Hollander, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e
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Chapter 2, Representation and Patterns: An Introduction to the REA Enterprise Ontology 8. Object patterns are sequences of events that typically occur in combination with each other. Ans: False Response: those are script patterns; object patterns are expected groupings of things and the relationships between them 9. The script patterns we develop based on past experiences help us more often than not in understanding our present and future experiences. Ans: True 10. Script patterns may not be invoked correctly unless the correct context is understood. Ans: True 11. The REA in the REA Enterprise Ontology stands for “R elationships between E ntities and A ttributes.” Ans: False Response: REA stands for Resources, Events, and Agents 12. Something that has economic value but has no physical substance and is consumed by an enterprise's operations is a resource in the REA ontology. Ans: True 13. In the REA ontology, events are activities within an enterprise that need to be planned, controlled, executed, and evaluated. Ans: True 14. In the REA ontology, only individuals fit into the agent category. Ans: False Response: agents may be individuals, departments, divisions, or organizations. 13 Dunn/Cherrington/Hollander, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e
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Chapter 2, Representation and Patterns: An Introduction to the REA Enterprise Ontology 15. A value system level REA model focuses on the individual steps involved in accomplishing events in an enterprise.
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Chap002 - Chapter 2, Representation and Patterns: An...

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