Chapter 14 - Chapter 14 Social Psychology: the subfield...

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Chapter 14 Social Psychology: the subfield that attempts to explain how the actual, imagined or implied presence of others influences the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals Confederate: Person who poses as a participant in an experiment but is actually assisting the experimenter Naïve Subject: Person who has agreed to participate in an experiment but is not aware than deception is being used to conceal its real purpose. I. Social Perception: the process we use to obtain critically important social information about others a. Impression Formation i. Primacy Effect: the tendency for an overall impression of another to be influenced more by the first information that is received about that person than by information that comes later. b. Attribution: An Assignment of a cause to explain one’s own or another behavior i. Situational Attribution: Attributing a behavior to some external cause or factor operating within the situation; an external attribution 1. Blame on others ii. Dispositional Attribution: Attributing a behavior to some internal cause, such as a personal trait, motive, or attitude; an internal attribution iii. Actor-Observer Effect: Tend to attribute our own as situational but others as dispositional iv. Fundamental Attribution Error: tendency to attribute others behavior to dispositional factors v. Self-Serving Bias: Our success attribute to dispositional but our failure attribute to situational
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II. Attraction a. Factors Influencing Attraction i. Proximity: physical or geographic closeness 1. Mere-exposure effect: the tendency to fee more positively toward a stimulus as a result of repeated exposure to it. ii. Reciprocity: phenomenon where we tend to like the people that we think like us. iii. Similarities iv. Physical Appearance b. i. Matching Hypothesis: The notion that people tend to have lovers or spouses who are similar to themselves in physical attractiveness and other assets. c.
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2011 for the course PSYC 1101 taught by Professor Morris during the Fall '08 term at Armstrong State University.

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Chapter 14 - Chapter 14 Social Psychology: the subfield...

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