probability

probability - LECTURE 10 Probability: An Introduction ->...

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LECTURE 10 Probability: An Introduction -> Probability is used as a mathematical tool to understand or describe random phenomena, chance variation and uncertainty ->Applications: genetics; quality control; finance, etc Basic Concepts ->Probability is used as a model/tell for situations for which outcomes occur randomly ->such situations are called experiments , and the set of all possible outcomes is called the sample space ->A simple event is the outcome of a single repetition of a random experiment ->One and only one simple event can occur when an experiment is performed once ->One can assign a probability to each simple event in the sample space ->The set of all possible events of an experiment is called the sample space (usually denoted by S) corresponding to that experiment ->An event (usually denoted by E, F, A, B, etc) is a collection of simple events. In another words, a subset of the sample space. ->Any subset of the sample space (including the empty set) is an event ->Two events are mutually exclusive if whenever one of them occurs and the other cannot occur Probability: Relative Frequency View ->How often does "an event" occur? Relative frequency = f/n ->As sample size n becomes "large" Relative frequency becomes better indication of probability Probability of an Event: Properties ->Probability of an event is a number between 0 and 1
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2011 for the course PSC 123 taught by Professor Roth during the Spring '10 term at San Diego.

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probability - LECTURE 10 Probability: An Introduction ->...

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