Croupier - 'Croupier gives viewers slick film noir Movie review By Samuel McKewon Posted"What kind of people are these"Drug dealers Mostly people

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
'Croupier' gives viewers slick film noir Movie review By: Samuel McKewon Posted: 8/24/00 "What kind of people are these?" "Drug dealers. Mostly people who work in the casino business." "And the girls?" "They're just girls." "Croupier" is the kind of movie that instinctively understands that kind of dialogue, and, more importantly, what kind of story ought to surround it. It's British film noir, a slick, coolly haunting portrait of the gambling London underground. But the movie has a decidedly international feel - good film noir is good, national origin regardless. But "Croupier" is better than that - an idealized version of the genre that seduces while it shocks. It plays itself as an easy mark, much like its protagonist, casino dealer Jack Manfred (Clive Owen) sees his clients as their grubby fingers plop chips onto the table. But as the tense closing sequences, which play like the last blackjack game before bankruptcy, unfold, the mark becomes pretty clear. It's pleasurable to find disjointed fragments come together, as they often do in David Mamet films. But there's a deeper, more rattling effect at work from director Mike Hodges, who set the standard for British gangster flicks with "Get Carter" in 1971. It opens with Jack, played by Owen with detached charm, struggling to make the right ends meet as a writer. A publisher wants a soccer novel, complete with blood, sex and drugs. Jack obliges but supplements his starving artist lifestyle with a croupier job at the London-based Golden Lion casino. Jack knows this game, having excelled at it in South Africa. When he returns to the mirror-filled basement of the casino, his voice over narration welcomes him back to "house of addiction." We come to learn what he's talking about.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
He's the son of a gambler, who seemingly hasn't made the right ends meet once in life. Jack won't gamble, can't gamble - it's against the croupier rules. There's other rules, all of which Jack commits himself. And then, one by one, he breaks them. Screenwriter Paul Mayersburg surrounds the scene with the typical noirish fare - a
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/17/2011 for the course POLITICAL 210 taught by Professor Amitage during the Spring '08 term at San Mateo Colleges.

Page1 / 4

Croupier - 'Croupier gives viewers slick film noir Movie review By Samuel McKewon Posted"What kind of people are these"Drug dealers Mostly people

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online