2_Supporting_Article - 8/25/2010 World U.S. New York Some...

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See a sample reprint in PDF format. Order a reprint of this article now MANAGEMENT AUGUST 9, 2010 Dow Jones Reprints: This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To order presentation-ready copies for distribution to y our colleagues, clients or customers, use the Order Reprints tool at the bottom of any article or visit www.djreprints.com Some Firms Struggle to Hire Despite High Unemployment World U.S. New York Business Markets Tech Personal Finance Opinion Careers Real Estate Small Business By MARK WHITEHOUSE In Bloomington, Ill., machine shop Mechanical Devices can't find the workers it needs to handle a sharp jump in business. Job fairs run by airline Emirates attract fewer applicants in the U.S. than in other countries. Truck-stop operator Pilot Flying J says job postings don't elicit many more applicants than they did when the unemployment rate was below 5%. With a 9.5% jobless rate and some 15 million Americans looking for work, many employers are inundated with applicants. But a surprising number say they are getting an underwhelming response, and many are having trouble filling open positions. "This is as bad now as at the height of business back in the 1990s," says Dan Cunningham, chief executive of the Long-Stanton Manufacturing Co., a maker of stamped-metal parts in West Chester, Daniel Shea for The Wall Street Journal A w orker at Mechanical Devices in Bloomington, Ill., w here the company set up a training program to fill open machinist jobs. 8/25/2010 Some Firms Struggle to Fill Jobs Despit… …wsj.com/…/SB1000142405274870489… 1/7
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More photos and interactive graphics The Long-Term Unemployed Nearly 1 in 10 Americans is unemployed, and 4.4 million of them have been out of a job at least a year and say they're still looking for work. Many more have given up. Here's a look at some of the people in this boat. Faces—and Fates—of the Jobless Although some employers report trouble finding workers, about 4.4 million Americans have been looking for jobs for at least a year—and that doesn't include the ones who have given up. Read some of their stories. Ohio, that has been struggling to hire a few toolmakers. "It's bizarre. We are just not getting applicants." Employers and economists point to several explanations. Extending jobless benefits to 99 weeks gives the unemployed less incentive to search out new work. Millions of homeowners are unable to move for a job because the real-estate collapse leaves them owing more on their homes than they are worth. The job market itself also has changed. During the crisis, companies slashed millions of middle-skill, middle-wage jobs. That has created a glut of people who can't qualify for highly skilled jobs but have a hard time adjusting to low-pay, unskilled work like the food servers that Pilot Flying J seeks for its truck stops. The difficulty finding workers limits the economy's
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2011 for the course ECON ECON 440 taught by Professor Kristinebrown during the Fall '10 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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2_Supporting_Article - 8/25/2010 World U.S. New York Some...

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