poetrystudyguide - Poetry Terms Reading a Poem verse any composition in lines of more or less regular rhythm usually ending in rhyme theme the central

poetrystudyguide - Poetry Terms Reading a Poem verse any...

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Poetry Terms Reading a Poem verse any composition in lines of more or less regular rhythm, usually ending in rhyme theme the central thought of the poem subject the main topic; what the poem is ‘about’ tone conveys an attitude toward the person addressed agency tells us who owns the poem; who possesses the verb; the subject of the sentence INTERNAL STRUCTURE of the poem Types of Poems lyric: a short poem expressing the thoughts and feelings of a single speaker aubade: a lover’s morning farewell epigram: a short and witty commentary epistle: informal, written as if a letter to a friend epithalamium: a lyric celebrating a marriage elegy: a formal lyric of mourning pastoral: about love in a rural, idyllic setting satire: a mocking critique of evil of foolishness, the poet ridicules someone ode: a formal lyric which celebrates or commemorates a person or object complaint: a lyric that unfolds as an occasion to complain emblematic / visual: physically look like what they describe (i.e. a poem shaped like wings)
expository: a lyric which feels kind for prosy didactic: written to state a message or teach a body of knowledge, often patriotic or moralistic meditative / intellecturalized: poems that verbalize or intellecturalize feelings visionaryL imagines unreal places with mystical fervor sensual: glorifies the body’s sensations confessional: dark inner truths are admitted and explored narrative: its main purpose is to tell a story ballad: a short narrative song which retells tales that were once song orally epic: longer narrative stories dramatic: presents the voice of an imagined character speaking directly dramatic monologues Organization / Structure meditative: speaker musing on a topic or idea where the poem becomes a thinking through narrative: the poem unfolds like a story, chronologically dramatic: the poem unfolds in scenes where we see distinct settings and moments acted out among characters serial / discursive: a topic thought through in a logical way (first, then, then..) descriptive: presents a scene, often a landscape, paints a picture ekphrastic: describes a work of art
occasional: written to commemorate or celebrate an event or famous person imitative – parodies, tributes, retellings of other poems image-organized: focuses our attention on a series of images hypotactic there are clear temporal, logical, and syntactic relations between members and sentences or stanzas expressed by words or phrases or by the use of subordinate phrases and clauses; very often narrative (i.e. “when”, “because”, “as a result”, “therefore”) paratactic verse based on the use of parallel statements placed one after another without any expression of their connection or relation (expect at most with the connective “and”) Word Choice diction choice of words

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