SAC 352 Final Study Guide

SAC 352 Final Study Guide - SAC 352: FILM HISTORY 1930-1959...

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SAC 352: FILM HISTORY 1930-1959 FALL 2008 – DANIEL HERBERT SASHA WANG FINAL STUDY GUIDE: PAGE 1 SAC 352: FILM HISTORY 1930-1959 Fall 2008 – Daniel Herbert Final Exam Study Guide The final exam for this course will take place on Wednesday, December 17. The exam will begin promptly at 4:10 pm, so you should be in your seats ready to begin at that time. It should take no longer than 110 minutes. BRING YOUR OWN BLUE BOOK. Bring more than one if you are verbose. The final exam will be comprised of identifications, fill-in-the-blank questions, and multiple- choice questions derived from lectures and readings from the second half of the semester. You will also have to answer two (2) essay questions from a selection of five (5) choices, which will draw upon the content for the ENTIRE semester (i.e., the essay questions will be CUMULATIVE, but the rest of the exam is not.) Some of the terms that you should know for the final: artisanal mode of production ”- America dominated the French market by the end of WWI. The French giants were reduced to distribution and exhibition, and were largely out of production. The film industry was characterized by a large number of small, under- capitalized companies. Financing was on a production-by-production basis. Investors would come together and riskily finance films. Money came from personal finances, institutional grants, and award prizes. There was an emphasis on having skilled people as opposed to big companies. “Atmospherics ”- One of the two styles of exhibition of the 1920s-1940s. There was a transition to sound, which eliminated independencies. Ticket prices were low. They were theater palaces with exotic Oriental décor. They were large and ornate including Astorias, Granadas, etc. “atomic photography” - Japanese, having to do with the atomic bombs that hit Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The “atomic bomb” is both a literal culture marker and a mental culture marker. “Like a scar on the Japanese mind and surface of reality.” There is no way of recording it, but “it records the world. The writing in light, the shadows that it burned, leaves traces of the body. “Borderless action” films - Nikkatsu specialized in borderless action films, which are a hybrid of French new wave, hardboiled detective, and film noir influences. They are
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SAC 352: FILM HISTORY 1930-1959 FALL 2008 – DANIEL HERBERT SASHA WANG FINAL STUDY GUIDE: PAGE 2 borderless because the setting is not important. The characters could be anywhere at anytime, and this malleability of narrative allowed the tone and mood to take precedence over expository details. Indeed some of these films are referred to as ‘mood action.’ Genres include rebellious youth films such as the delirious angry young man film, or the terse noir- action. “playback singing”
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SAC 352 Final Study Guide - SAC 352: FILM HISTORY 1930-1959...

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