1 - Welcome to the Purdue OWL Purdue OWL Writing Lab OWL...

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Welcome to the Purdue OWL Purdue OWL Writing Lab OWL News Engagement Research Contact Site Map General Writing Research and Citation Teaching and Tutoring Subject Specific Writing Job Search Writing ESL OWL Family of Sites > OWL > General Writing > Academic Writing > Establishing Arguments Skip Navigation General Writing Academic Writing The Rhetorical Situation Establishing Arguments Strong Thesis Statements Research and Evidence Organizing Your Argument Rhetorical Strategies Logic in Argumentative Writing Paragraphs and Paragraphing Essay Writing Conciseness Paramedic Method: A Lesson in Writing Concisely Reverse Paramedic Method Adding Emphasis Sentence Variety Using Appropriate Language Active and Passive Voice Email Etiquette Email Etiquette for Students Giving to the OWL
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Suggested Resources -2009 MLA Guide -2009 APA Guide -Purdue OWL Flash Movies
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-Purdue OWL Podcasts -How to Navigate the New OWL -Workshop and PowerPoint Index
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-Owl Exercises This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/). When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice at bottom. Developing Strong Thesis Statements Summary: These OWL resources will help you develop and refine the arguments in your writing. Contributors: Stacy Weida, Karl Stolley Last Edited: 2010-11-16 10:26:40 The thesis statement or main claim must be debatable An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could reasonably have differing opinions on. If your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted as fact then there is no reason to try to persuade people. Example of a non-debatable thesis statement:
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2011 for the course ENG 106 taught by Professor Steve during the Spring '10 term at Purdue University.

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1 - Welcome to the Purdue OWL Purdue OWL Writing Lab OWL...

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