Rise%20of%20Hip%20Hop(2) - Rise of Hip Hop...

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Unformatted text preview: Rise of Hip Hop Postindustrialism and Black Power Last Poets Gil Scott Heron Hip Hop emerged from a turbulent context Black Power and pop culture (political and cultural nationalists) Red, Black, Green (Black Arts Movement) The 1970s (Context for Hip Hop) Vietnam War (Cost of war and federal budget deficit) Israel, Middle East, Iran, and the Oil Embargo American industrial shift (from production to distribution/marketing) Inflation/Stagflation Foreign competition (Japan, Western Europe) and foreign labor ("third world" production) Continued in 80s Ronald Reagan (Reaganomics) 1980s (Context for Hip Hop) Low taxes for middle and upper class (750 billion) Cut social programs/low income (500 billion) Kept Social Security and Medicare Food stamps, public service jobs, welfare, after school programs, student loans, urban mass transit, antibusing, antiaffirmative action, gentrification Increased defense spending (1.5 trillion) Moral injection (too much focus on social ills than strengths of American society) War on drugs (middle class education "Just Say No") Crack and urban crime Sought to correct domestic and foreign policy ills What is Hip Hop? Background of Hip Hop Hip Hop = cultural form that attempts to negotiate the experiences of marginalization, brutally truncated opportunity, and oppression within the cultural imperatives of African American and Caribbean history, identity, and community Reimagines urban life through sampling, attitude, dance, style, and sound effect. Rose in mid70s South Bronx (Black and Latino youth) Often criticized by those who do not have an invested interest in the communities or lives of those represented in Hip Hop Rap Music = Composition of rhymed storytelling accompanied by highly rhythmic, electronically based music. Call & Response, improvisation, syncopation, drum as storytelling (African musical traditions) 4 Components of Hip Hop Graffiti = spray painted murals and name "tags" on public spaces (reclaiming of ownership) Break dancers = Bboys & Bgirls who created and engaged in elaborate dances (head spins, inverted dance style) DJs = (disk jockeys), created street parties in places that lacked community centers, used technology Rap Music (use prior definition) Hip Hop gave voice to the tensions and contradictions in the public urban landscape and sought to shift control to the dispossessed. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised You will not be able to stay home, brother. You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out. You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and Skip out for beer during commercials, Because the revolution will not be televised. The revolution will not be televised. The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox In 4 parts without commercial interruptions. The revolution will not show you pictures of Nixon blowing a bugle and leading a charge by John Mitchell, General Abrams and Spiro Agnew to eat hog maws confiscated from a Harlem sanctuary. The revolution will not be televised. The revolution will not be brought to you by the Schaefer Award Theatre and will not star Natalie Woods and Steve McQueen or Bullwinkle and Julia. The revolution will not give your mouth sex appeal. The revolution will not get rid of the nubs. The revolution will not make you look five pounds thinner, because the revolution will not be televised, Brother. There will be no pictures of you and Willie May pushing that shopping cart down the block on the dead run, or trying to slide that color television into a stolen ambulance. NBC will not be able predict the winner at 8:32 or report from 29 districts. The revolution will not be televised. There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down brothers in the instant replay. There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down brothers in the instant replay. There will be no pictures of Whitney Young being run out of Harlem on a rail with a brand new process. There will be no slow motion or still life of Roy Wilkens strolling through Watts in a Red, Black and Green liberation jumpsuit that he had been saving For just the proper occasion. Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Hooterville Junction will no longer be so damned relevant, and women will not care if Dick finally gets down with Jane on Search for Tomorrow because Black people will be in the street looking for a brighter day. The revolution will not be televised. There will be no highlights on the eleven o'clock news and no pictures of hairy armed women liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose. The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb, Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth. The revolution will not be televised. The revolution will not be right back after a message about a white tornado, white lightning, or white people. You will not have to worry about a dove in your bedroom, the tiger in your tank, or the giant in your toilet bowl. The revolution will not go better with Coke. The revolution will not fight the germs that may cause bad breath. The revolution will put you in the driver's seat. The revolution will not be televised, will not be televised, will not be televised, will not be televised. The revolution will be no rerun brothers; The revolution will be live. Realness in Hip Hop? What is authentic Hip Hop and who defines it? Is there a commonality between artists such as Nas, Dead Prez, Missy Elliot, Eminem, Project Pat (etc)? Is it commercialization and creative control? ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2011 for the course AAS 271 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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