45+Week+4+Lecture+1 - Periclean Revolution, Thucidydes' Peloponnesian

45+Week+4+Lecture+1 - Periclean Revolution, Thucidydes' Peloponnesian

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IAS 45 Survey of World  History Week 4 Lecture 1: Instructor: Joseph W.H. Lough Phone: 510.219.6569 • email:  joseph_lough@berkeley.edu Office Hours: Tues. 1-5 125 Stephens Hall GSIs: Rachel Brahinsky rbrahinsky@berkeley.edu Patrick Hazelton phazelton@berkeley.edu Johntell Washington johntell@berkeley.edu
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Review Alternative Pathways Agricultural Innovations Larger Populations Trade Wealth War and Conflict Further Gender Differentiation Further Social, Economic, and Political  Stratification
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Preview The Periclean Revolution: The Cradle of  Democracy Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian  War
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The Periclean Revolution Before Pericles Athens ruled by oligarchs Balance among oligarchs maintained by  measured use of the ostragon a piece of pottery on which citizens would scratch  the name of a citizen who had grown too powerful  for the health of the politeia the pieces would be cast in a pot or pit the person named most frequently in any casting  of ostragons would be ostracized—expelled from  the politeia
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The Periclean Revolution Pericles (495-429 BCE) from the right kind of oligarchic family poised to share rule with other Athenian  oligarchs but something troubled Pericles why should he have to share rule? wouldn’t Athens fare better—receive more fame,  glory, tribute, and praise—if its leadership were not  divided? seemingly overnight, Pericles renounces his  aristocratic pedigree and adopts the manifesto 
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The Periclean Revolution Pericles (495-429 BCE) although he himself has been the subject of  attempted ostracism, he objects I am a democrat I am a friend of the common man it is my political enemies who are attempting to  seize power from the people (the hoi  polloi : the  many) it is they—e.g., Kimon—who should be subject to  ostracism
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45+Week+4+Lecture+1 - Periclean Revolution, Thucidydes' Peloponnesian

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