45+Week+8+Lecture+2 - Capitalism and Religion, Birth of Modern Religion

45+Week+8+Lecture+2 - Capitalism and Religion, Birth of Modern Religion

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Unformatted text preview: IAS 45 Survey of World History Week 8 Lecture 2: Instructor: Joseph W.H. Lough Phone: 510.219.6569 email: joseph_lough@berkeley.edu Office Hours: Tues. 1-5 125 Stephens Hall GSIs: Rachel Brahinsky rbrahinsky@berkeley.edu Patrick Hazelton phazelton@berkeley.edu Johntell Washington johntell@berkeley.edu Review Problem Formation Tips The Atlantic World First Encounters First conquests Worlds Entangled Increasing Economic Linkages and Social and Political Effects (Mercantilism) New Colonies in the Americas Review Worlds Entangled The Slave Trade and Africa The Wealth of Nations The Great Divergence Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Transformations of Europe Preview Fighting words: politics, sex, and religion From A Smith to Asia The Great Divergence Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Transformations of Europe An old debate: the relationship between capitalism and religion The Birth of Modern Religion Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Europeans were not so dominant in Asian trade networks as they were in the Atlantic world. Yet by 1750 parts of Asia were beginning to feel the brunt of growing European military, political, and economic power Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century The Dutch in Southeast Asia The Dutch government chartered the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1602 to challenge the Portuguese and Spanish influence in the Indian Ocean system Because of Amsterdams financial strength, the VOC was able to raise more capital than any of its European competitors Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century The Dutch in Southeast Asia (contd) The Dutch government chartered the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1602 to challenge the Portuguese and Spanish influence in the Indian Ocean system (contd) The VOCs goal was to achieve a trade monopoly wherever it could In the 1620s, the VOC seized the city of Jakarta (which they renamed Batavia) on the island of Java and the nutmeg-producing islands known as Banda and proceeded to monopolize the nutmeg trade Asia in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century The Dutch in Southeast Asia (contd) The Dutch government chartered the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1602 to challenge the Portuguese and Spanish influence in the Indian Ocean system (contd) The VOCs goal was to achieve a trade monopoly wherever it could monopolize the nutmeg trade The VOC went on to capture the cities of Melaka and Banten in an effort to control the entire spice trade in...
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45+Week+8+Lecture+2 - Capitalism and Religion, Birth of Modern Religion

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