Five Pillars of Islam Checkpoint

Five Pillars of Islam Checkpoint - The interpretations may...

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Islam is second with devoted followers of religions worldwide. Christianity is first. Muslims are those that practice Islam. A higher number of Muslims live in Asia, not the Middle East as many people frequently think. The Five Pillars of Islam are the basic beliefs of Muslims. They are as follows: 1. A profession of faith (shahada). All Muslims must proclaim “There is no God but Allah and Muhammed is his prophet.” 2. Prayer (salat). All Muslims must pray five times daily while facing the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. 3. Alms (zakat). Faith also means outreach to those less fortunate. 4. Fasting (sawm or siyam). Muslims who are physically able are to fast from dawn to dusk during the ninth month (Ramadan) of the Islamic calendar. 5. A pilgrimage (hajj) to Mecca. At least once in their lives, all Muslims who are able must make a pilgrimage to the Great Mosque in Mecca. Muslims are a diverse group. They do have a common belief of following the Qu’ran.
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Unformatted text preview: The interpretations may be different, but the belief in the message of Allah is the same. The easiest of the Five Pillars to fulfill would be the profession of faith. Anyone can proclaim their adherence to a religion, but may not be sincere. One must truly believe in the religion and adhere to the beliefs to be sincere. To put ones faith in God needs to be from the heart. Expressing words alone is not sufficient. The most challenging of the Five Pillars to fulfill would be fasting during Ramadan. Fasting is limiting food and water intake. The belief is that through fasting one can clear their mind and achieve a closeness with God. Personally, I do not partake in any type of fasting. I tend to have low sugar and severe headaches when I do not eat. I searched for information regarding fasting in the Islam religion and could not find if any exceptions are made for health reasons....
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2011 for the course FIN 200 taught by Professor Williams during the Fall '08 term at University of Phoenix.

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